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User / The Molotov Line photographer / Sets / Molotov Line Journals
Piotr Tymiński / 91 items

N 48 B 3.6K C 19 E Oct 23, 2011 F Jun 2, 2014
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This small pillbox, designed for one heavy machine gun, still retains its original protective embankment.
As soon as construction work was finished outer walls were covered with tar to prevent moisture from eroding the concrete. The black smudges are still clearly visible. Once it dried, stones were piled up against the walls and covered with sand/earth to form embankments providing additional protection against direct artillery hits.

This one was processed 50% with OnOne Perfect Photo Suite and 50% with NIK Color Efex Pro. Pulled froma single RAW with ACDSee Pro 8 (a sort of Lightroom in case you wonder, but WAY faster. Some dynamic contrast added selectively + some vignette blur, these done in Perfect Effects module. Then squeezed through a preset which I developed in NIK Color Efex Pro - for a kind of smooth look I was after.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные podlaskie Polska PL decay Art Poland Pentax Art HDR landscape nik software onone software Visualmanuscripts

N 3 B 599 C 0 E Sep 13, 2012 F Jul 10, 2014
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A single-casemate pillbox in the forests north-east of Osowiec Fortress.
One of the smallest structures built on the Molotov Line, housing a 7,62 mm Maxim heavy machine gun. It was equipped with an optic scope which greatly increased accuracy within its 2,2 km ( 1,37 mile) effective range of fire.

Remnants of an earth embankment covering the structure are still visible. Back in 1941 it was completely hidden under a pile of stones and earth. With grass and scrub growing on the roof, much like on the photo, this small killer was hardly visible to the enemy.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker decay derelict fortification Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line monochrome pentax Pentax Art pillbox shelter Soviet texture urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные BiaĹ‚aszewo Podlaskie Poland POL Visualmanuscripts

N 8 B 1.1K C 0 E Apr 12, 2012 F Apr 30, 2015
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A heavily damaged antitank semi-caponier. Casemates, once housing two heavy machineguns and an antitank gun, are utterly destroyed. Loopholes and their armored housings are blown off and the floors in the firing chambers and other compartments have collapsed.
This pillbox have already sustained some damage in June 1941 (exposed reinforced bars near he top of the front wall mark the places of direct hits) but it has met its ultimate fate when explosive material was used to extricate the armored housings.
A concrete ditch in front of the damaged loopholes served an important purpose. It was a simple, yet effective way to protect the armament from direct assault. Masses of earth and sand, thrown up by any close artillery hits, would slide into the ditch, thus keeping the field of fire clean and preventing the loopholes from being buried under the heap of soil.
Guns, firing from inside the pillbox, would also discharge their empty shell cases into the ditch through special openings close to its bottom, making the collection of precious reusable metals easy.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   bunker fortification history military Molotov Line photography pillbox Piotr Tyminski Poland Soviet stylized textured ww2 Lubycza Królewska Polska POL Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 580 C 0 E Nov 7, 2012 F Jun 2, 2014
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This two-loophole heavy machine gun half caponier looks realy nice from the front. It even had its armored housings fitted which is not a common sight when it comes to majority of Soviet pillboxes in Lithuania.
Actually this pillbox, screening a vital road hub in the city of Sakiai, is effectively a pile of rubble. Its rear wall is entirely torn away and huge chunks of reinforced concrete litter the field at the back of it, surely giving enough reason for the local farmer to curse its existence. The interior is swept clean with the same massive explosion which disintegrated half of the pillbox including part of the roof.
These are not typical combat scars, this bunker shared the fate of many of the neighboring structures in the Sakiai strongpoint.
Right after the war tons of munitions were littering the fields and they had to be disposed of somehow. There was no time and resources to move them away to remote locations or firing grounds and these abandoned fortifications came in as a handy place to blast whatever dangerous stuff army engineers had collected.
It was a “controlled explosion”.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Lithuania LTU decay Art Visualmanuscripts

N 9 B 2.9K C 0 E Apr 11, 2015 F May 2, 2015
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After the so called September Campaign of 1939 was over, and the joint German-Soviet attack crumbled the resistance of Polish armies, hundreds of thousands of Soviets were stationed in the newly occupied, eastern part of Poland.
Among them were thousands of officers of the Red Army. They were professional soldiers who brought their families with them. In this way, countless Russian civilians lived among the Polish population, in numerous villages and towns where flats and houses were requisitioned for them.

In 1941 signs of incoming trouble for the Soviets were already apparent - former allies were just about to start their deadly struggle - but the communist authorities still refused to evacuate the families of the officers. Such precaution could "incite panic and encourage nationalist elements". It probably could - they all lived in a subjugated and hostile country, after all.
Consequently, in June 1941 countless families of the Soviet servicemen were caught in the maelstrom of war.

Mrs Pelagia Yefremova Suleykina lived in a village of Anusin. There were two children with her, too: a three year old daughter and a son - on the 22nd June 1941 he was just 24 days old. Her husband was a lieutenant of the Red Army, an officer commanding a company of heavy machine guns supposed to man dozens of bunkers which had been built in the vicinity of Anusin and Słochy Annopolskie villages.

When the German attack began, she took cover in one of the bunkers, along with several other wives of the officers. Those concrete slabs were not made for women and children and it may seem strange why they decided to do so. They probably did not feel secure among the "nationalist elements" or, it seems, the Soviet border guards did not feel secure themselves, and they advised the women to leave the village and head for the bunkers.

Was it this very pillbox on the picture? Or one of many others hidden today in the forests nearby? We will never know for sure. And I can only try to image horror scenes in those narrow confines of the cold, concrete chambers, filled with smoke and soot, cries of the children terrified by the roar of the guns and then darkness creeping in when the lights went out.
And at that time Mrs Suleykina did not know that it'd take Germans five long days to quell the resistance of a pillbox which was located just several hundreds meters away from their own hideout.
Its stubborn defenders died under the rubble and her husband was one of them.

Mrs Suleykina and her children survived the war, her story was published in a collection of memoirs "Bug River on fire" in 1965.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr.

Tags:   abandoned bunker clouds color derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pillbox Piotr Tyminski Poland sky Soviet textured tree ww2 Pentax Art Visualmanuscripts


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