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User / The Molotov Line photographer / Sets / Molotov Line Journals
Piotr Tymiński / 91 items

N 3 B 679 C 0 E Sep 13, 2012 F Jul 10, 2014
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A single-casemate pillbox in the forests north-east of Osowiec Fortress.
One of the smallest structures built on the Molotov Line, housing a 7,62 mm Maxim heavy machine gun. It was equipped with an optic scope which greatly increased accuracy within its 2,2 km ( 1,37 mile) effective range of fire.

Remnants of an earth embankment covering the structure are still visible. Back in 1941 it was completely hidden under a pile of stones and earth. With grass and scrub growing on the roof, much like on the photo, this small killer was hardly visible to the enemy.

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Tags:   abandoned bunker decay derelict fortification Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line monochrome pentax Pentax Art pillbox shelter Soviet texture urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные BiaĹ‚aszewo Podlaskie Poland POL Visualmanuscripts

N 3 B 610 C 0 E Jul 11, 2009 F Jun 2, 2014
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Mortar shell lies quietly in one of the demolished pillboxes of Zambrow Fortified Region, Poland.
"Yous should call the cops" - I said to a farmer who came to see who was lurking on his field - "They'd get some army engineers here and remove the stuff. You know, kids love playing with these. It's an invitation to disaster"
"Bah..." replied the guy - "They've been playing here since ages. Nothing has ever happened."

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Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Śniadowo Podlaskie Poland POL decay Art Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 1.6K C 0 E Apr 21, 2009 F Jun 2, 2014
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A story of “The Norm”.

A pile of stones and some barbed wire, still remembering the summer of 1941.
Construction of hundreds of pillboxes of the Molotov Line required huge amounts of stone. It was crushed and mixed with fresh concrete. The best one was coming from the Caucasus Mountains – a long and expensive journey. So, inevitably, local stones were used on a massive scale. But they did not come by themselves.
Soviets, as mad and ruthless as they were, were also very precise and rigorous people. Not content with herding thousands of civilians into forced labor zones, they also came up with a set of precise rules, or “norms”, regulating who, how much, when and how was supposed to contribute to the overall effort of “defence works”.
It was carefully planned and calculated how many stones each local farmer had to bring to the building site. You've got a horse? Two? If two, then you need to bring more. It was that simple. No horse? You will dig foundation trenches then or, better even, endless anti-tank ditches. There were norms stipulating how many cubic meters of earth one needs to remove and what is the distance that removed portion needs to be moved away.

I always go around those remote, small villages asking about anti-tank ditches. As huge as they had been, they are hard to find today, most eaten up by forests and cultivated fields. But every piece of information is precious when drawing the maps of those forgotten strongpoints. I'm always very careful not to overuse the technical and military jargon – these are mostly simple people I talk to. But most often than not I found myself disappointed that they did not understand what I was asking about. It's a simple thing – an anti-tank ditch – even the name implies it, hey, it;s just a damn, deep ditch, that's all about it!
And then, to my horror, the answers started to pop out like a devil from the box. Of course they knew what an anti-tank ditch was! I was simply asking a wrong question... They had a different word for an anti-tank ditch. The one they remembered from their fathers and grandfathers, the one which which was so feared as it was hated, the one so horrible it stuck in the minds of simple folk for generations.

The called it “the norm”.

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Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные podlaskie Polska PL decay Art Poland Visualmanuscripts

N 4 B 517 C 0 E Apr 4, 2009 F Jul 27, 2014
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Big and heavy, rusted but still strong enough to help lifting a a massive gun mounted in the pillbox.
There were always two sets of these hooks: one attached to the ceiling and the other one on the wall at the back of the gun. Iron ropes would be attached to them to help lifting the gun from its place when it needed replacement or servicing.

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Tags:   historic history military Soviet ww2 Molotov Line pillbox bunker war defence Poland Linia Mołotowa derelict forgotten urbex urban exploration Pentax Zambrowski Rejon Umocniony punkt oporu Prosienica POL Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 430 C 0 E Nov 7, 2012 F Jun 2, 2014
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Under a toxic sky... sits quietly this forgotten antitank pillbox built in summer of 1941. Beautiful and mighty from the front, is a miserable ruin from the back. It's never had the 45 mm antitank gun installed and the heavy machine gun has never been placed in its second fighting compartment.
Unfinished and never manned by the hastily retreating Soviets, it shared a fate of several other pillboxes located on the outskirts of small town of Sakiai. Used as a detonation site for disposing of unused ammunition scattered across the fields, had its rear wall totally blown of. Interior chambers and firing compartments are also heavily damaged but the outer shell still stands defiantly ...under a toxic sky.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Lithuania LTU decay Art Visualmanuscripts


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