Fluidr
about   tools   help   Y   Q   a         b   n   l
User / The Molotov Line photographer / Sets / Molotov Line Journals
Piotr Tymiński / 91 items

N 3 B 726 C 0 E Apr 11, 2012 F May 11, 2015
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

In 1939 Soviet aggression against Poland was a quick affair. The overwhelming superiority of the Soviet forces concentrated on the eastern border of Poland, coupled with an obvious fact that practically all the Polish army was fighting the German invasion in the west, resulted in a quick capture of almost half of the country. The partition of Poland between Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia was quickly confirmed by the victors in their Ribbentrop-Molotov pact signed on August 23rd 1939.

Formidable Soviet fortifications, known today as the Molotov Line, were built in occupied Poland, all along the "new" Soviet-German border. An interesting fact about these military installations is that none of the dozens of truly modern pillbox designs envisaged the use of armored cupolas. These, in turn, were quite popular on a few fortifications, which Poles managed to build before September 1939. There were plans to bolster the eastern defences of Poland but there was not enough time, and not much money, to do it before the Soviets attacked. Some of the already produced armored cupolas were captured by the advancing Red Army in Polish military stores, along with other booty.
Soviets engineers were quick to adapt some of their own pillbox designs to utilize these brand new captured equipment. A couple of dozens of them were hauled to Rava-Ruska Fortified Region (today in south-eastern Poland and south-western Ukraine) and the installation work began. Some of these cupolas saw fierce combat, most of them evaporated much later - falling prey to scrap collectors. Very few smaller ones survived till today.
And the history played an ironic trick here: just as the Poles did not manage to install them before the Soviet attack, their new owners did not manage to utilize most of their loot before the German onslaught cut through an unfinished Molotov Line in 1941.
Some of the pillboxes located in Rava-Ruska Fortified Region feature vertical shafts with simple ladders but armored cupolas never came. Germans came instead.
One such shaft in an unfinished antitank pillbox is featured on the photo.
After 75 years the only good thing is that it allows some light into the usually cold and dark belly of a forgotten concrete slab lost in the forest.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr.

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   Linia Mołotowa history Poland photography military stylized Soviet ww2 Molotov Line pillbox bunker fortification textured split-tone kopuła pancerna Polska POL Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 304 C 0 E Oct 24, 2011 F Jun 2, 2014
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

This 1,5 ton armored housing for a 45 mm antitank gun is stepped to reduce damage from ricochets and is a fine example of good quality craftsmanship. Some of them, still covered in their factory grease, might be quite usable even today – not bad at all for a Soviet-made thing. No wonder then that many of them were “gently” extracted by the Germans who happily reused the precious metal for their Atlantic Wall defences.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные decay Art Poland Visualmanuscripts

N 9 B 2.0K C 1 E Apr 23, 2009 F Jun 2, 2014
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

The Eyes Of A Monster.

This anti-tank caponier looks like a relic of an ancient race. Huge, with a space designed for two 45mm anti-tank guns and four heavy machine guns, has never been fully armed and stands as a silent witness to the ill-fated Molotov Line.

Two square-shaped openings visible in the ceiling of the right loophole served an important purpose. Once the massive concrete slab was in place the builders still needed to fit in the armored housings for the guns. The box-shaped housing consisted of two parts: one fitted from the inside (yes, they needed to put it there before they made the roof!) and the one coming from the outside. They were joined together by massive screws. Then a big metal funnel was placed on the roof and its tip protruded downwards through the opening. Fresh concrete was poured through the funnel and it tightly filled all the space inside the armored housing, effectively fixing it in place and making it an integral part of the whole monolith.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Poland POL decay Art texture Pentax Art Visualmanuscripts

N 4 B 427 C 0 E Apr 4, 2009 F Jul 27, 2014
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

Big and heavy, rusted but still strong enough to help lifting a a massive gun mounted in the pillbox.
There were always two sets of these hooks: one attached to the ceiling and the other one on the wall at the back of the gun. Iron ropes would be attached to them to help lifting the gun from its place when it needed replacement or servicing.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   historic history military Soviet ww2 Molotov Line pillbox bunker war defence Poland Linia Mołotowa derelict forgotten urbex urban exploration Pentax Zambrowski Rejon Umocniony punkt oporu Prosienica POL Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 414 C 0 E Apr 12, 2012 F Jun 2, 2014
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

Ruins of a two- storey frontal-firing three-loophole heavy machine gun pillbox.
Huge internal explosion has swept the interior clean. The roof (170 cm of reinforced concrete supported by extra heavy beams) is also cracked open; a huge hole is gaping at the sky giving a clue to the power of a shaped charge which had been detonated there.
Armored housing for Maxim heavy machine guns are still in place, as well as metal plates lining the walls. They served as a protection from pieces of concrete which could be torn from the walls by heavy shelling – these could easily wreak havoc in the tight interior.
There is no floor - it collapsed entirely – and I took the photo standing at the bottom of a lower storey which is normally below ground level.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Lubycza Królewska Lubelskie Polska POL decay Art Poland Visualmanuscripts


5.5%