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User / The Molotov Line photographer / Sets / Molotov Line Journals
Piotr Tymiński / 91 items

N 1 B 1.0K C 0 E Nov 5, 2012 F Jun 2, 2014
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Trigger-happy

Gloomy, rain soaked machinegun semi-caponier idles on the filed south of Neman river. It never had its designated two Maxim machine guns fitted and, most probably, there was no crew to man it neither.

It was no obstacle for the advancing German units, it did not fire on the approaching enemy and was not fired upon. But a closer inspection reveals that what is known today as a “trigger-happy syndrome”, known from the battlegrounds of Iraq or Afghanistan, was apparently doing well in opening hours of 1941 German-Soviet war.
There's a metal “L”-shaped pipe protruding outwards from one of the walls – it's a part of the air exchange system which had never been installed inside. The immediate area around the pipe is pockmarked with bullet marks and the pipe itself is riddled with bullet holes.
I can almost see those youngsters in field grey uniforms, sleeves rolled up in June heat, as defiant as they are disappointed – the enemy is fleeing too quickly and they have no chance to pull the trigger. The pillbox is empty and there's no sign of the Soviets. How about a quick shooting competition then? Who cares about couple of rounds? There aret tons of spare ammo! And the poor pipe looks so inviting.
Little they knew on that warm day of June 1941. There was a lot of real shooting awaiting them in the years to come and, most probably, very few of them lived to tell the tale.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Lithuania LTU decay Art Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 872 C 0 E Sep 19, 2009 F Jun 2, 2014
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Entrance to the big artillery pillbox ( 2 x 76,2 mm gun).
No guns were ever installed there but the huge armored housings, 3.689 kg each, were already in place.
Remains of pair of hinges can be seen in the entrance – a crude iron crate was to be installed there. A simple but effective way to make the life of a grenade-wielding attacker a bit more complicated, just in case he'd get an idea of getting into the main armored door inside.
The loophole to the right was deigned for a light machine gun. Its sole duty was to protect the entrance from the same grenade-wielding guy who, if still alive, would have to gnaw at the crate which barred the entrance.

Inscription painted at the wall says “Military Property”. Way back in the sixties and then again in 1970 Polish Army was doing a tour of the defences, cataloging them meticulously, with a view of revitalizing some of the pillboxes. With the Cold War bringing the prospect of a nuclear mushroom ever closer the idea of having hundreds of ready made shelters seemed tempting.

So, here's the shelter number 513: tickets, please.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные decay Art Poland Visualmanuscripts

N 14 B 2.7K C 2 E Apr 15, 2010 F Jun 2, 2014
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This 3 x heavy machine gun pillbox, located just 6 km from the former German-Soviet border, shared the fate of almost all Molotov Line bunkers in Lithuania: unfinished and unmanned proved to be no obstacle for the advancing German troops.

Its front part, where the machine guns were supposed to be fitted in three separate casemates, is entirely blown off after it had served as a testing site for the pioneers.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Lithuania LTU decay Art Pentax Art texture Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 978 C 0 E Nov 22, 2009 F Jun 3, 2014
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Almost like an abstract - outer wall of the pillbox with neat holes made by direct hits of artillery. Most probably these are not typical combat scars, it seems the German gunners trained their small calibre 3,7 cm PAK 36 gun (or similar) at the wall to see the result of the impact. They probably did it after the pillbox was abandoned since such aggregation of hits would hardly be possible in combat situation.
But German shells which in 1941 pierced through the layer of concrete reveal another piece of forgotten history.
The black stone visible in the holes was a precious building material which was brought all the way from the Caucasus mountains. It was expensive and there was never enough of it so a regular stone, collected locally, was crushed into small pieces and was widely used, too.
I wonder who were the people who toiled their lives away in forced labor camps and stone quarries from which the building material was coming. Because what was expensive was the stone and coal to fuel the endless trains bringing it far to the western, newly conquered part of the Soviet Union. People were not expensive, they were expendable and there was always enough slaves to propel the mercilles machinery of gulag.
It's a strange feeling to run my fingers along the edges of these holes touching the black stone. It's like stretching my hand to touch the shoulder of an unknown human, long gone and forgotten, whose life had probably rotten away somewhere far away in a hell hole of a labor camp.
For the glory of the Empire.

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Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification geotagged history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Szulborze Wielkie Mazowieckie Poland POL decay Art Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 504 C 0 E Sep 15, 2012 F Jun 2, 2014
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A heavily damaged, two-loophole artillery semi-caponier.
These type of artillery pillboxes, housing two 76,2mm guns as their main armament, were usually built on the flanks of the strongpoints. With a 7,3 km (4,53 miles) range of fire they were supposed to provide long range anti-tank fire as well as to suppress the efforts of enemy infantry to infiltrate the gaps between neighboring strongpoints.

Both armored housing for the guns were blown off and put to better use by the Germans – mind you, it was 3.689 kg of good quality metal - and that's for a single housing excluding the weight of the gun itself.

Huge chunks of concrete lying around give a clue to the amount of explosive material which had been needed to “gently” extract those heavy lumps of metal.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Wąsosz Podlaskie Poland POL decay Art Visualmanuscripts


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