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User / The Molotov Line photographer / Sets / Molotov Line Journals
Piotr Tymiński / 91 items

N 1 B 480 C 0 E Apr 4, 2011 F Jun 2, 2014
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This is a typical view of the Lithuanian countryside and that's how the small pillboxes which dot the landscape look like. In fact you can't see this one at all, it's all covered with an extra embankment, overgrown with bushes and the local farmer added to the camouflage by stacking some firewood and wood logs nearby.
This forgotten concrete slab is the smallest type of pillboxes built on the Molotov Line. Single firing chamber, single Maxim heavy machine gun – that's all. Their loopholes seldom faced the direction from which the expected enemy might've come. They were usually built fdeeper inside the strongpoints and their role was to cover the back of the bigger pillboxes in order to make sure there were no dead zones left in the firing system of the strongpoint.

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See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Lithuania LTU decay Art landscape Visualmanuscripts

N 6 B 2.7K C 0 E Sep 13, 2014 F Sep 22, 2014
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I love the place: dusty country roads, patches of forests and gently rolling hills. This particular strongpoint is a compact one, with just 13 pillboxes. Whenever I sit on the roof of any of them I can see almost the whole bunch scattered around the area as far as the old 1941 German-Soviet border.
The vital road going from a railway hub of Łomża was screened by numerous strongpoints and the Soviets did their best to catch up with the construction schedule. While in many other places all they came up with were empty concrete shells with no equipment fitted, here they did manage to fully equip some of the pillboxes.
But still many were empty and elaborate diagrams chalked by the builders on the walls are the only proof where the wiring and plumbing would go. It's a strange feeling to look at the drawings – they are clear for me, but I still have that weird feeling that I am looking at the hieroglyphics carved by an unknown breed of some ancient species.
And it's even stranger to remember that within a day or two from the moment they carefully chalked their schematics they had to run madly for their lives.
We have all seen the old WW2 photographs showing flocks of Soviet prisoners, some even partly dressed, hands high in the air, animal fear in their eyes. Yes, they were the enemies, but they were humans after all, too.
And these diagrams remind me there were indeed living beings once lurking there because I can feel their fear forever lingering in the cold, empty chambers.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   Linia Mołotowa abandoned derelict forgotten history colors light fine art creative Poland photography military Soviet ww2 Molotov Line pillbox bunker color ruins fortification Pentax Pentax Art Osowiecki Rejon Umocniony HDR punkt oporu Łebki Andrychy podlaskie Polska PL Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 528 C 0 E Apr 23, 2009 F Jun 2, 2014
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Ruins of a heavy machine-gun pillbox which guarded a vital road to Grodno (in today's Belarus).
Here, in June 1941, unlike in most other places, Red Army offered fierce, albeit short-lived, resistance. Ther are several dozens of pillboxes scattered in the nearby magnificent Augustów Primeval Forest and, although construction work was going on night and day, only some were fully equipped and armed. Still, it was better than nothing and much better than in many other places along the Molotov Line.

Interestingly, some crews of the bunkers fought bravely till their doom, while many other decided that discretion was a better part of valor. Local inhabitants can still remember which pillboxes offered stiff resistance – their fathers and grandfathers buried the defenders.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Lipsk Podlaskie Poland POL decay Art landscape Visualmanuscripts

N 9 B 2.6K C 0 E Apr 11, 2015 F May 2, 2015
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After the so called September Campaign of 1939 was over, and the joint German-Soviet attack crumbled the resistance of Polish armies, hundreds of thousands of Soviets were stationed in the newly occupied, eastern part of Poland.
Among them were thousands of officers of the Red Army. They were professional soldiers who brought their families with them. In this way, countless Russian civilians lived among the Polish population, in numerous villages and towns where flats and houses were requisitioned for them.

In 1941 signs of incoming trouble for the Soviets were already apparent - former allies were just about to start their deadly struggle - but the communist authorities still refused to evacuate the families of the officers. Such precaution could "incite panic and encourage nationalist elements". It probably could - they all lived in a subjugated and hostile country, after all.
Consequently, in June 1941 countless families of the Soviet servicemen were caught in the maelstrom of war.

Mrs Pelagia Yefremova Suleykina lived in a village of Anusin. There were two children with her, too: a three year old daughter and a son - on the 22nd June 1941 he was just 24 days old. Her husband was a lieutenant of the Red Army, an officer commanding a company of heavy machine guns supposed to man dozens of bunkers which had been built in the vicinity of Anusin and Słochy Annopolskie villages.

When the German attack began, she took cover in one of the bunkers, along with several other wives of the officers. Those concrete slabs were not made for women and children and it may seem strange why they decided to do so. They probably did not feel secure among the "nationalist elements" or, it seems, the Soviet border guards did not feel secure themselves, and they advised the women to leave the village and head for the bunkers.

Was it this very pillbox on the picture? Or one of many others hidden today in the forests nearby? We will never know for sure. And I can only try to image horror scenes in those narrow confines of the cold, concrete chambers, filled with smoke and soot, cries of the children terrified by the roar of the guns and then darkness creeping in when the lights went out.
And at that time Mrs Suleykina did not know that it'd take Germans five long days to quell the resistance of a pillbox which was located just several hundreds meters away from their own hideout.
Its stubborn defenders died under the rubble and her husband was one of them.

Mrs Suleykina and her children survived the war, her story was published in a collection of memoirs "Bug River on fire" in 1965.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr.

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned bunker clouds color derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pillbox Piotr Tyminski Poland sky Soviet textured tree ww2 Pentax Art Visualmanuscripts

N 2 B 498 C 0 E Apr 4, 2011 F Jul 30, 2014
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Deserted and forgotten – silent sentinel on the shore of a lake in Lithuanian forest.
Is there a story it could tell? A story of great engineering feat, a story of power and highest expectations? A story of the army which was to march to the rocks of Gibraltar and beyond?
Or a story of panic and deafeat, a story of absolute failure and shame?
On a hot summer evening, when the sun is sliding beyond the horizon and the lake glows like gold, you may try to touch its cold, concrete walls and listen.
After 74 years it may tell you the truth.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   Linia Mołotowa urbex texture abandoned derelict decay forgotten historic history urban exploration foliage sky old colors painterly light lost lake clouds military Soviet ww2 Molotov Line pillbox bunker Lithuania Okręg olicki Pentax Pentax Art Visualmanuscripts


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