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User / The Molotov Line photographer
Piotr Tymiński / 250 items

N 1 B 281 C 0 E Apr 3, 2010 F Jun 5, 2014
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They are trying to turn it into a hotel... or so I heard. With lower levels flooded with water and inhabited by rats – why not? It could be the only one of its kind.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned decay derelict fortification fortress military Modlin urban exploration urbex Nowy Dwór Mazowiecki Mazowieckie Poland POL HDR Pentax Art Visualmanuscripts

N 47 B 4.2K C 19 E Oct 23, 2011 F Jun 2, 2014
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This small pillbox, designed for one heavy machine gun, still retains its original protective embankment.
As soon as construction work was finished outer walls were covered with tar to prevent moisture from eroding the concrete. The black smudges are still clearly visible. Once it dried, stones were piled up against the walls and covered with sand/earth to form embankments providing additional protection against direct artillery hits.

This one was processed 50% with OnOne Perfect Photo Suite and 50% with NIK Color Efex Pro. Pulled froma single RAW with ACDSee Pro 8 (a sort of Lightroom in case you wonder, but WAY faster. Some dynamic contrast added selectively + some vignette blur, these done in Perfect Effects module. Then squeezed through a preset which I developed in NIK Color Efex Pro - for a kind of smooth look I was after.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные podlaskie Polska PL decay Art Poland Pentax Art HDR landscape nik software onone software Visualmanuscripts

N 5 B 1.8K C 0 E Sep 15, 2012 F Jun 23, 2014
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This antitank pillbox, designed for two machine guns and a 45mm antitank gun, is a bit of an oddity. It is connected by an underground passage with two other pillboxes and forms a small group clustered close together in the forest. It's the only ony visible enough for taking a photo since it's just on the edge of that forest.
There are several such groups in the area and the question is: why build them this way? There are thousands of pillboxes on the Molotov Line, yet there are only a dozen which were connected underground. They were usually built in pairs and only one had an entry, the other being accessible only through the passage from the first one. After years of research the answer WHY is still eluding us. Thre area in which they were built is no different (in terms of terrain) that any other so why bother? On the other hand, there are places where it would make sense to construct such clusters of connected pillboxes but again, they did not bother to do it.
Soviets had always been masters of improvisation and made good engineers and builders (in a truly positive sense) but sometimes we tend to overestimate their wisdom. The explanation might be simple and, to some extent, laughable. Somebody made a plan, sooner or later it had to be implemented somewhere. They happened to have enough building material so they did it right there. There were many cases when what was effectively built was seriously drifting away from what was initially made on the drawing board. Plans were changed, factories producing various parts of equipment were not informed on time and the builders, always in a mad rush to catch up with the schedule, were ending up with a pile of stuff which was not quite compatible with the original design. And so they had to change things on the fly – all these stories are described in surviving (very few) memoirs of those who had been building these vast fortifications. In some way, they are fun to read...
Therefore it is not excluded that somebody all of a sudden remembered that there was a design a bit different than the common ones, parts of the underground passage were ordered (sort of concrete Lego bricks, nothing fancy), then promptly brought by train (or could've been even made locally) and voila, here it is!
Or, the chief engineer responsible for this particular part of the line, just liked the idea of undergound passages:)
Once you learn to think the Soviet way, things sometimes become just a little bit more obvious...

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox Poland shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Pentax Art Visualmanuscripts

N 2 B 317 C 0 E Aug 25, 2013 F Jul 18, 2014
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Texturized photograph of Narew River in Kępa Kikolska, Poland.
In springtime the river usually rises high, almost to the top of the small bluff which lines its southern shore. But in summer it runs low and once you manage to plough your way through the thicket little sandy spots may be discovered where trees, ravaged by the swift current, still cling to life.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   water pentax atmosphere black branches calm clouds creative fine art gold landscape light lonely monochrome mood Narew Piotr Tyminski reeds reflection river shadow silhouette sky texture tree Tyminski vintage waterside reeds yellow Czarnowo, Nowy Dwór Mazowiecki Masovian Voivodeship Poland abstract Czarnowo, Nowy Dwór Mazowiecki County Pentax Art Visualmanuscripts

N 13 B 1.5K C 4 E May 1, 2014 F Jun 5, 2014
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Construction of the grain storage for the Modlin Fortress started in 1832 and was completed in 1844. This beautiful neo-renaisssance building was designed by a renowned architect Jan jakub Gaya and is located on a narrow promontory between Vistula and Narew rivers. Oiginally designed as a storage facility could also be used in a defensive role. Despite serious damage suffered in 1939 (and in post-war years when it was decided to demolish the building in order to recover building material) it is still a majestic site and a joy to look at. What remains today is practically just a half of the original storage but it's still huge. Wide stairs lead from the gate straight down to the river where once barges unloaded their cargoes. Remains of a crane mechanism are still there and it's a joy to sit there and contemplate the mighty Narew river flowing by.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned decay derelict fortification fortress military Modlin urban exploration urbex Nowy Dwór Mazowiecki mazowieckie Polska PL HDR Pentax Art Poland Pentax Art landscape architecture Visualmanuscripts


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