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User / The Molotov Line photographer
Piotr Tymiński / 250 items

N 21 B 2.1K C 16 E Jul 28, 2014 F Jul 29, 2014
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Tradition since 1893. Machines, tanks and motorcycles. And 1.500.00 tractors exported to every corner of the globe. 12.000 employees. Schools, kindergardens, medical center, hotels for workers and a small railway station - all to accomodate the vast army of workers.
And a name coming from a book by Nobel Prize winner Polish writer.
I sit on a derelict railway track and watch the huge watchtower's shadow, hardly visible as the sun dies. There are many of them, once equipped with huge reflectors, and they all surround a huge square made of concrete slabs where once hundreds of shiny tractors awaited loading and transportation. Trees, tangled bushes and grass, reaching to my armpits, cover the place now.
For a second I think of climbing the watchtower to look at the glory turned into dust but then I remember that I am no longer a brave Warsaw Pact special trooper.
Instead I am old and lazy. And I am scared of that feeble, rusted ladder leading to the platform at the top.
And so I am sitting on a useless, rusted railway track with a Red Bull in my hand. I should be making photos, that's what I came for. But I only made three snaps. Three!
Instead I'm mysteriously glued to that track and, thinking of 1.500.000 tractors, I watch the approaching storm.
And then I do something I normally never do. I toss the empty can far away and the wind kicks it viciously along the railway track. Cling-clang... cling-clang...
The rain starts falling.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   urbex texture abandoned derelict decay forgotten urban exploration sky landscape colors light lost fine art clouds photography eerie art stylized railway rails tower Ursus factory Poland Pentax Pentax Art Warsaw train Visualmanuscripts

N 11 B 2.7K C 1 E Nov 12, 2014 F Dec 27, 2014
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First mentions of compass originate from China and are as old as 2nd century BC. Surprisingly, although most decent smarphones and tablets have GPS-supported compass biult in, there are still very few people who know how to use a real compass properly.
All what the common knowledge comes to is that the needle points to the north. Well, this is true (sort of) but actually this seemigly simple device is capable of - i.e. when used with a map - to calculate a ton of data. If you know how...

I can still recall when a fellow researcher, who is a former scout (and a professional surveyor by trade, too!), patiently tried to explain me that north was, well.. not exactly to the north and that the azimuths we measured were just a decent attempt at measuring what we thought to be the most accurate and correct thing in the world...
I've learned a lot since then and a pair of trusty compasses is an indispensable set of tools when lurking on the Molotov Line. We widely use satellite imagery, good quality GPS devices (no, not a smartphone for God's sake!), trackloggers and a ton of other stuff but still an ancient compass is of great help.

When I manage to locate, say, 15 pillboxes scattered on the field or hidden in the forest and I collect their GPS locations and then put them all on the map all I get is eeerm.... a map with 15 blobs. Except for the information that they are there it means nothing. But when I use my compass to measure the azimuth from each and every loophole in each and every pillbox and then add them to the map it all suddenly becomes clear. Why were they built this way, why here and not 50 meters to the south? Why this one is facing north and the other one west? Seeing in which direction they were supposed to fire transforms 15 blobs on a map into a clear and meaningful plan of a defence line.

Can a compass be useful for you today, providing you are not lurking on the Molotov Line? Sure it can!
Next time you face an avalanche of questions from your wife - just because you went to buy cigarettes and failed to come back for three days - just say you lost your compass.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   texture history fine art photography military stylized ww2 Molotov Line color textured compass still life Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 468 C 0 E Aug 4, 2009 F Jun 5, 2014
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It has always puzzled me why there are so many derelict and abandoned houses in rural areas of Lithuania. It's a small and beautiful country but the population, except for towns and cities, is pretty much scattered. Young people do not want to live in the remote places where their fathers lived . Inevitably, the old ones stay, unwilling or unable to move elsewhere, until merciless time takes them away.

During one of my trips to the Alytus Fortified Region I came around a dream-like place: a pond hidden behind a tree-covered hill, an old wooden house - already in a state of disrepair - and a new, modern two-storey house just behind it. An old man, apparently living there alone, explained that he had build the new house for his children.
"But they are living abroad now" he said, "and they are not going to come back".
"Why don't you move to the new house then? The one right here?" I asked.
He glanced back at the old wooden house and then, with that strange expression on his face, a mixture of sadness and defiance, said:
"Because this one my home."

Will I ever meet that old man again when I'm there one day? Or all I will see will be the nature claiming back its share like here on the photo? Will he tell me some old story or it will be just the wind blowing there through the broken windows?

In fact the photo you see was taken just several hundred meters from the old man's place.
I don't know who lived there.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned decay derelict Lithuania LTU Pentax Art landscape Visualmanuscripts

N 4 B 861 C 0 E Sep 8, 2014 F Sep 8, 2014
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Gunkanjima (Hashima) Island, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan

The ultimate kingdom of urban exploration – the famous Battleship Island (Hashima).
At some point in its history it was the most densly populated island on the globe. It was utterly abandoned in 1974 but its location and claustrophobic concrete canyons are a sight to behold.

This is a digitally modified and geotagged image from Google Street View.
The original GSV is at: goo.gl/maps/P4I65 and is copyrighted by Google.
Stylized version originally developed for Artistic Google project by Piotr Tymiński.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   urbex texture abandoned derelict decay forgotten historic history urban exploration lost stylized texturized ruins ue Hashima Gunkanjima Japan island Google Maps Google Street View GSV Nagasaki Prefektura Nagasaki Japonia JP Visualmanuscripts

N 9 B 1.5K C 3 E Apr 14, 2012 F Jun 2, 2014
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A simplified version of an antitank pillbox. No hydraulics, no armor housings, just a concrete slab designed to protect a 45 mm antitank field piece which was simply rolled inside.
These kind of bunkers were usually pushed to the foreground, usually several kilometers ahead of the main defense line.
In this particular area Soviet border in 1941 formed a sharp bulge dangerously protruding into German territory, just begging to be cut off. Main strongpoints were therefore built farther to the rear and the borderline was screened with a number of simplified constructions.
Still, they were unmanned and were generally left undefended and therefore were quickly bypassed by the advancing Germans.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

See more at: www.visualmanuscripts.com or connect with me on Google+, Facebook or Twitter.

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Cieszanów Podkarpackie Polska POL decay Art Poland texture Pentax Art Visualmanuscripts


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