Fluidr
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With its long neck a "Great Blue Heron" makes it appear easy to preen even the most awkwardly positioned feathers on its body.
Birds preen in order to keep their feathers in the best condition. While preening they remove dust, dirt and parasites and align each feather to its optimum position relative to adjacent feathers and body shape. Most birds will preen several times a day. Most birds contain a uropygial gland or preen gland witch is found near the base of the tail and produces an oily, waxy substance that helps waterproof the feathers and keep them flexible. While preening, the birds spread this oil to each feather so they are evenly coated and moisturized which keeps their feathers flexible and strong.

Tags:   birds herons great blue herons preening birds birds preening birds of north america birds of vancouver island birds of BC birds of the pacific northwest feathers nature wildlife water ocean shoreline esquimalt lagoon sandy hill photography photography nature photos

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Did you know that like other jays, the "Steller's Jay" has numerous and variable vocalizations? They are also known as mimics, because of their ability to mimic vocalizations of many species of birds and other animals, as well as non animal sounds. They will imitate calls from birds of prey causing other birds to seek cover and flee feeding areas.
The Steller Jay is the provincial bird of the Canadian province of British Columbia.
The Steller's Jay occurs in most of the forested areas of western North America as far east as the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains from southern Alaska in the north to northern Nicaragua completely replacing the blue jay prevalent on the rest of the continent in those areas.

Tags:   steller's jays jays blue jays noisy birds pretty birds blue feathers birds of vancouver island birds of the pacific northwest birds of north america nature wildlife calling sandy hill photography photos art

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A "Black Oystercatcher" flaps its wings, ridding itself of excess water and dander. The tide being out allowed the Black Oystercatcher with its long red beak to efficiently forage for mussels and limpets.
Black Oystercatchers are a year round resident of B.C. seashores. It is endemic to the west coast of North America, where it is widely distributed from Baja California to the western Aleutian Islands.

Tags:   oystercatchers black oystercatchers shorebirds wings birds in action shorebirds in action shorebirds of north america shorebirds of B.C. birds of the pacific northwest feathers autumn ocean salt water shoreline nature wildlife birds of vancouver island sandy hill photography sandy hill photos

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In the shallow ocean waters on east Vancouver Island, four Canadian Geese appear to be enjoying some preening time together.


I had this printed as an 18" X 12" canvas for my bathroom wall and so happy with how it printed out. I chose this one, because the turquoise in the water and the browns of the geese tie in with the colors in my bathroom.

Tags:   birds geese canada geese canadian geese preening misty water ocean shallow feathers birds of the pacific northwest nature shorebirds action sandy hill photography sandy hill photos birds of vancouver island birds of bc shorebirds of bc

N 71 B 843 C 26 E May 26, 2019 F Jul 17, 2019
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A male Pine Siskin reaches down to get a drink and almost reaches! Actually, he successfully does manage to maneuver down far enough to get a drink, but it was close.

Pine Siskin are a North American bird of the finch family. It is a small finch that ranges from 11-14cm ( 4.3-5.5in), with a wingspan of 18-22cm (7.1-8.7in) and weighs between 12-18 g ( 0.42-0.63oz).

The Pine Siskin's breeding range is across the entirety of Canada, Alaska and, to a more variable degree, across the western mountains and northern parts of the United States.

Likely due to success of crops from year to year, the Pine Siskin is a highly variable migration species of bird. Large numbers may move south in some years and hardly any in others.

Photo taken on May 26/19 at 4:26pm on south east Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada.

Tags:   birds pine siskin sandy hill photography nature wildlife finches birds of the pacific nor west birds of vancouver island birds of BC birds of canada feathers spring


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