Fluidr
about   tools   help   Y   Q   a         b   n   l
User / rwfoto_de / Contacts
50 items

N 68 B 803 C 0 E Sep 17, 2018 F Sep 19, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M
N 34 B 424 C 1 E Mar 26, 2017 F Sep 19, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

KLKGZ01615p_S_

N 278 B 1.4K C 7 E Nov 26, 2017 F Sep 19, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M
N 16 B 225 C 2 E Nov 10, 2012 F Sep 19, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Tulum (Yucatec: Tulu'um) is the site of a Pre-Columbian Maya walled city serving as a major port for Cobá.

The ruins are situated on 12-meter tall cliffs, along the east coast of the Yucatán Peninsula on the Caribbean Sea in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico.

Tulum was one of the last cities inhabited and built by the Mayans; it was at its height between the 13th and 15th centuries and managed to survive about 70 years after the Spanish began occupying Mexico. Old World diseases brought by the Spanish settlers appear to have been the cause of its demise. One of the best-preserved coastal Maya sites, Tulum is today a popular site for tourists.

El Castillo, the Temple of the Frescoes, and the Temple of the Descending God are the three most famous buildings. Among the more spectacular buildings here is the Temple of the Frescoes that included a lower gallery and a smaller second story gallery. The Temple of the Frescoes was used as an observatory for tracking the movements of the sun. Niched figurines of the Maya “diving god” or Venus deity decorate the facade of the temple. This “diving god” is also depicted in the Temple of the Diving God in the central precinct of the site. Above the entrance in the western wall a stucco figure of the “diving god” is still preserved, giving the temple its name. A mural can still be seen on the eastern wall that resembles that of a style that originated in highland Mexico, called the Mixteca-Puebla style, though visitors are no longer permitted to enter.

Also in the central precinct is the Castillo, which is 7.5 m tall. The Castillo was built on a previous building that was colonnaded and had a beam and mortar roof. The lintels in the upper rooms have serpent motifs carved into them. The construction of the Castillo appears to have taken place in stages. A small shrine appears to have been used as a beacon for incoming canoes. This shrine marks a break in the barrier reef that is opposite the site. Here there is a cove and landing beach in a break in the sea cliffs that would have been perfect for trading canoes coming in. This characteristic of the site may be one of the reasons the Maya founded the city of Tulum exactly here, as Tulum later became a prominent trading port during the late Postclassic.

Tags:   Tulum Pre-Columbian Maya Quintana Roo Mexico


10%