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N 4 B 1.9K C 19 E May 1, 1995 F Nov 22, 2008
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Head on in the dust storm,K2 . see larger

Tags:   karakoram 1995 Jan Reurink Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region dust storm K2 nature Photo story འདྲ་པར སྒྲུང་། drapar drung storytelling photo storytelling photography

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Tags:   Tibet 2008 Jan Reurink markham county smar-khams བོད། བོད་ལྗོངས། Gartok Tibetan བོད་པ། བོད་རིགས། Kham ཁམས། བཀྲ་ཤིས་བདེ་ལེགས།

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The word ke’u tshang means “cave,” “cavern,” or “overhang.”[1] Tsong kha pa (1357-1419) lived for a time in a very precariously situated cave over a steep gorge to the east of the original Keutsang Hermitage, and it is possible that the hermitage derives its name from this cave. While Tsong kha pa was living there, there was a serious earthquake, and he exclaimed “a ma”![2] The letters “a” and “ma” then imprinted themselves onto a rock next to the cave, and these, we were told, can be seen to this day. The cave itself fell in a landslide, and no longer exists.

The present Keutsang Hermitage is the rebuilt version of Keutsang West (Ke’u tshang nub), which today lies in ruins. The rebuilt Ke’u tshang abuts the ruins of Keutsang West on the former’s eastern side. Rather than rebuilding on the ruins of the old hermitage, the monks chose to start from scratch and to relocate the hermitage just to the west of Keutsang West, which they say was a site more suitable to building.

Ke’u tshang is located to the east of Se ra on the side of a mountain above Lha sa’s principal cemetery. Ke’u tshang is also located just below (about a five-minute walk from) Rakhadrak Hermitage (Ra kha brag ri khrod). It takes about fifty minutes to walk from Se ra to Ke’u tshang. The hermitage is the second-to-last stop on the Sera Mountain Circumambulation Circuit (se ra’i ri ’khor) route that pilgrims navigate as part of the Sixth-Month Fourth-Day (Drug pa tshe bzhi) festivities.

The hermitage is enclosed by a perimeter wall with two gates, one to the west and one to the east. Outside the western gate there is a tiny chapel that houses a self-arisen rock-image of the deity Acala (Mi g.yo ba) that was originally on a boulder in the area that is presently the “Dharma courtyard” (chos rwa). It was moved from the Dharma courtyard to its present spot because the head of the hermitage believed that at its former site it was too close to an area where the monks urinated.

At the center of the compound is the (two-story) main temple. The first floor contains the monastery’s principal assembly hall (’du khang). The second story contains a reception and meeting room. Just to the east of the temple is the monastery kitchen. The monks for the most part eat communally, and all of the meals are prepared here. Flanking the temple-kitchen complex on both sides are two wings of monks’ living quarters. Just to the west of the western wing of monks’ rooms, adjacent to the western gate, is a new guest house that was just being completed in 2004.

The monks of Ke’u tshang in a prayer-assembly inside the main temple. They wear the yellow ceremonial robe (chos gos). Behind the main temple is the large, three-story “ secondary temple building.”

•The first floor of this building contains little more than the stairway to the second floor and some storage rooms.
•The second story contains, on one side, a Scripture Temple (Bka’ ’gyur lha khang) that houses the collection of scriptures. This room also contains a small protector deity altar. The main figure in the middle of the alter is Dpal ldan lha mo; she is flanked on one side by Rdo rje g.yu sgron ma, the “site deity” (gnas bdag) of this location, and on the other by Nyang bran rgyal chen. These three are the chief protector deities of the hermitage. On this same level but at the other end of the building there is a Tengyur chapel (Bstan ’gyur lha khang) that houses the collection of the translated Indian treatises.
•The third floor contains the private quarters of the Da lai bla ma, the rooms of the Ke’u tshang bla ma and the Maitreya Chapel (Byams khang), whose main image is a famous two-story Maitreya (Byams pa) that overlooks the cemetery below the hermitage. Like the stone Buddha image at Pabongkha Hermitage (Pha bong kha ri khrod), this Maitreya (Byams pa) is said to guarantee rebirth in a pure land to any individual whose remains are brought to the cemetery beneath Ke’u tshang. According to another tradition, this Maitreya statue and the one in the Maitreya Chapel in the northern end of the Bar skor in Lha sa are said to constantly exchange rays of light with one another.

The two-story Maitreya image on the top floor of the secondary temple building at Ke’u tshang.

Finally, to the east of the secondary temple building (in the northeastern corner of the hermitage) there is a large “Dharma enclosure” or chos rwa that in 2004 was just being completed. Since Ke’u tshang is a ritual monastery, the younger monks principally use the Dharma enclosure as a place to sit and memorize ritual texts when their rooms become cramped and they want some fresh air.

All of the images in Ke’u tshang’s various temples and chapels are new.


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Notes
[1] An informant, a former monk of the hermitage (ri khrod), says that the word ke’u tshang means “small monastery.”

[2] The Tibetan word a ma literally means “mother,” but it is also a cry of fear.


source : www.thdl.org/collections/cultgeo/mons/sera/hermitages/ind...

Tags:   Tibet 2008 Jan Reurink Keutsang Lhasa K'eu tshang Tsong kha pa Ke’u tshang nub se ra’i ri ’khor Drug pa tshe bzhi Mi g.yo ba chos rwa ’du khang chos gos Bka’ ’gyur lha khang Dpal ldan lha mo Rdo rje g.yu sgron ma gnas bdag བོད། བོད་ལྗོངས། U-Tsang དབུས་གཙང་། བཀྲ་ཤིས་བདེ་ལེགས།

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Like to see the pictures as Large as your screen? Than why not click on the Slideshow : www.flickr.com/photos/reurinkjan/sets/72157622436074363/s...

Degè སྡེ་དགེ། became the capital of the kingdom in the 15th century under the reign of Lodro Tobden, the 31st in the line of the Degè kings. It was he who invited Thang Tong Gyalpo to establish the renowned Gongchen Monastery in the region. The kingdom expanded during the 18th century under the reign of Tenpa Tsering, who conquered territories to the north.

In 1727, the Kingdom of Dege and other regions in Eastern Tibet fell under the governance of China. It is linked with others of the "more important districts", as Spencer Chapman termed them, such as Nyarong, Batang, Litang, and the five Hor[pa] States under the name "Kham", which Chapman describes as "an indefinite term suitable to the Tibetan Government, who are disconcertingly vague over such details as treaties and boundaries." In 1733. The Yongzheng Emperor granted the king of Dege status of Hsuan Wei Ssu, a high position for native chieftains which effectively permitted him independence, though he was responsible for paying tribute. In spite of the change of provenance, the kings of the region continued their internal struggles, and in 1863, rule of the kingdom was disrupted for two years by the successful invasion of Nyarong. Intervention by the army of Tibet restored the kingdom, following a brief intermediate governance.

In the early 1900s, Eric R. Coales prepared a report that included information about the "recent" history of the kingdom for the British. According to Coales' report, in 1895, the Governor-General of Szechuan sent forces into Chantui, led by General Chang Chi, who advanced further into Dege. The king and his family were imprisoned in Chengdu. By the time political intrigue in China had forced the troops to withdraw, the king had died, leaving behind two sons, Doje Senkel and Djembel Rinch'en. The former of these enjoyed the support of the Chinese, but the latter, who may have been illegitimate, had backers in Chantui. The two struggled over the throne until 1908, when Doje Senkel appealed for assistance to the Chinese General Chao Eh-Feng, who was on military campaign in the area to secure the political primacy of China. Djembel Rinch'en was driven to take sanctuary with the Dalai Lama, Thubten Gyatso; Doje Senkel yielded the kingdom to China in exchange for an allowance. The Chinese retained direct control of Dege until 1918.

The palace of the Dege kings was subsequently converted into a school.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingdom_of_D%c3%aag%c3%aa

Tags:   Tibet བོད བོད་ལྗོངས། 2009 ༢༠༠༩ © Jan Reurink Tibetan Plateau བོད་མཐོ་སྒང་ bö togang Kham ཁམས། Derge སྡེ་དགེ county Derge སྡེ་དགེ Rain Retreat Festival Tibetan ethnicity བོད་རིགས། buddhism སངས་རྒྱས་ཆོས་ལུགས། path tradition ལམ་ལུགས་

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Like to see the pictures as Large as your screen? Than why not click on the Slideshow : www.flickr.com/photos/reurinkjan/sets/72157622436074363/s...

The Tibetan shoes in the picture are speaking of what kind of shoes can monks wear and what kind of shoes they can’t wear. Tibetan boots are called in Tibetan “Lham ལྷམ། བོད་ལྷམ།”

First shoes ” blue boots”: When the first donor of the Buddha went to Nepal region, he suffered from cold weather. Because of this, monks who live in places where there are a lot of snowfalls and ice on the ground are allowed to wear long shoes with shoe-laces and hats. This regulation is only for those who live in harsh climate.

Second shoes ” red boots”: The type of shoes that monks don’t wear is shoes that make a sound like dragging a sheep’s horn on the ground.

Third shoes ” green boots”: The monks shouldn’t wear shoes that are decorated like the leaves of the Bhodi tree and white flowers.

Fourth shoes ” blue green boots”: Monks shouldn’t wear shoes that are decorated with gold and silvery and also the shoes that look very beautiful.

Fifth shoe “sole”: Monks shouldn’t wear shoes that make ChuChu sound (for example, sound made by shoes when you walk in the snow). They also shouldn’t wear shoes that make DuDu sound.

Sixth shoe “sole”: The monks shouldn’t wear shoes that make sound like stepping on the wooden floor.

The text in this picture is translated for me by a good friend,Thanks again .

Took this picture in the Monastery of Minyag Lhagang Yongdzog Rabgi Lhakang Tongdrol Samdribling.It was built in the year 652 by the Tibetan king, Songtsen Gampo, in the town of Lhagong

Tags:   Tibet བོད བོད་ལྗོངས། 2009 ༢༠༠༩ © Jan Reurink Tibetan Plateau བོད་མཐོ་སྒང་ bö togang Kham ཁམས། Dardo དར་མདོ་ county Lhagong ལྷ་ གོང་ Zhara Lhatse ཞ་ར་ ལྷ་ སྟེ་ 5820 m (19094ft) ཨོཾ་མ་ཎི་པ་དྨེ་ཧཱུྃ། Om Mani Peme Hung བཀྲ་ཤིས་བདེ་ལེགས། Sacred Mountains of Tibet Lhagang Gompa ལྷ་ གང་དགོན་ Minyag Lhagang Yongdzog Rabgi Lhakang Tongdrol Samdribling མི་ཉག་ ལྷ་ གང་ཡོང་ ཡོང་ ཛོག་ རབ་ གི་ ལྷ་ཁང་ ཏོང་ དྲོལ་ སམ་ དྲིབ་ གླིང་ chorten མཆོད་རྟེན༏ mchod rten buddhism སངས་རྒྱས་ཆོས་ལུགས། Nyingmapa Sherda ཉིང་མ་ མ་ པ་ ཤེར་ ད་ Prayer flags on staff དར་ལྕོག prayerflag དར་ལྕོག


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