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User / Mukul Banerjee (www.mukulbanerjee.com) / Sets / Lodi Gardens, New Delhi - July 2013
Mukul Banerjee / 48 items

N 3 B 2.0K C 2 E Jul 13, 2013 F Jul 24, 2013
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Lodi Gardens is a park in Delhi, India. Spread over 90 acres (360,000 m2), it contains, Mohammed Shah's Tomb, Sikander Lodi's Tomb, Sheesh Gumbad and Bara Gumbad, architectural works of the 15th century Sayyid and Lodis, a Pashtun dynasty which ruled much of Northern India during the 16th century, and the site is now protected by the Archeological Survey of India (ASI). The gardens are situated between Khan Market and Safdarjung's Tomb on Lodi Road. It is beautiful and serene, and is a hotspot for morning walks for the Delhiites. The tomb of Mohammed Shah, the last of the Sayyid dynasty rulers, the earliest of the tombs in the garden, was built in 1444 by Ala-ud-din Alam Shah as a tribute to Mohammed Shah. As there is little architecture from these two periods remaining in India, Lodi Gardens is an important place of preservation. The tomb of Mohammed Shah is visible from the road, and is the earliest structure in the gardens. The architecture is characterised by the octagonal chamber, with stone chhajjas on the roof and guldastas on the corners. Another tomb within the gardens is that of Sikander Lodi, which is similar to Mohammed Shah's tomb, though without the chhatris, it was built by his son Ibrahim Lodi in 1517, the last of Sultan of Delhi from Lodi dynasty, as he was defeated by Babur, First battle of Panipat in 1526, this laying the foundation of the Mughal Empire. His tomb is often mistaken to be the Sheesh Gumbad, and is actually situated in near the tehsil office in Panipat, close to the Dargah of Sufi saint Bu Ali Shah Qalandar. It is a simple rectangular structure on a high platform approached by a flight of steps. The tomb was renovated by the British, and an inscription mentioning Ibrahim Lodi's defeat at the hands of Babur and the renovation was included in 1866. Under the Mughals major renovations would often take place depending on what occasions they would use the gardens for, under Akbar the Great the garden was used as an observatory and to keep records in a purpose built library. In the centuries, after the 15th century Sayyid and Lodi dynasties, two villages grew around the monuments, but the villagers were relocated in 1936 in order to create the gardens. During British Raj, it was landscaped by Lady Willingdon, wife of Governor-General of India, Marquess of Willingdon, and hence named the 'Lady Willingdon Park' upon its inauguration on April 9, 1936,and 1947, after Independence, it was given its present name, Lodi Gardens.

Source : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lodi_Gardens

Tags:   Lodi Gardens Lodi Medival Park Garden Mohammed Shah Tomb Architecture Sikander Lodi 'Bara Gumbad Bara Gumbad 15th century Sayyid 1444 Ala-ud-din Alam Shah octagonal chamber guldastas 1517 Ibrahim medival india Sultan Islam Islamic Islamic Architecture History Muslim photographs Photo Nikon D300 Sigma 10-20mm Mosque monument HDR 'Lady Willingdon

N 2 B 1.5K C 0 E Jul 13, 2013 F Jul 24, 2013
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Lodi Gardens is a park in Delhi, India. Spread over 90 acres (360,000 m2), it contains, Mohammed Shah's Tomb, Sikander Lodi's Tomb, Sheesh Gumbad and Bara Gumbad, architectural works of the 15th century Sayyid and Lodis, a Pashtun dynasty which ruled much of Northern India during the 16th century, and the site is now protected by the Archeological Survey of India (ASI). The gardens are situated between Khan Market and Safdarjung's Tomb on Lodi Road. It is beautiful and serene, and is a hotspot for morning walks for the Delhiites. The tomb of Mohammed Shah, the last of the Sayyid dynasty rulers, the earliest of the tombs in the garden, was built in 1444 by Ala-ud-din Alam Shah as a tribute to Mohammed Shah. As there is little architecture from these two periods remaining in India, Lodi Gardens is an important place of preservation. The tomb of Mohammed Shah is visible from the road, and is the earliest structure in the gardens. The architecture is characterised by the octagonal chamber, with stone chhajjas on the roof and guldastas on the corners. Another tomb within the gardens is that of Sikander Lodi, which is similar to Mohammed Shah's tomb, though without the chhatris, it was built by his son Ibrahim Lodi in 1517, the last of Sultan of Delhi from Lodi dynasty, as he was defeated by Babur, First battle of Panipat in 1526, this laying the foundation of the Mughal Empire. His tomb is often mistaken to be the Sheesh Gumbad, and is actually situated in near the tehsil office in Panipat, close to the Dargah of Sufi saint Bu Ali Shah Qalandar. It is a simple rectangular structure on a high platform approached by a flight of steps. The tomb was renovated by the British, and an inscription mentioning Ibrahim Lodi's defeat at the hands of Babur and the renovation was included in 1866. Under the Mughals major renovations would often take place depending on what occasions they would use the gardens for, under Akbar the Great the garden was used as an observatory and to keep records in a purpose built library. In the centuries, after the 15th century Sayyid and Lodi dynasties, two villages grew around the monuments, but the villagers were relocated in 1936 in order to create the gardens. During British Raj, it was landscaped by Lady Willingdon, wife of Governor-General of India, Marquess of Willingdon, and hence named the 'Lady Willingdon Park' upon its inauguration on April 9, 1936,and 1947, after Independence, it was given its present name, Lodi Gardens.

Source : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lodi_Gardens

Tags:   Lodi Gardens Lodi Medival Park Garden Mohammed Shah Tomb Architecture Sikander Lodi 'Bara Gumbad Bara Gumbad 15th century Sayyid 1444 Ala-ud-din Alam Shah octagonal chamber guldastas 1517 Ibrahim medival india Sultan Islam Islamic Islamic Architecture History Muslim photographs Photo Nikon D300 Sigma 10-20mm Mosque monument HDR 'Lady Willingdon

N 1 B 1.4K C 0 E Jul 13, 2013 F Jul 24, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Lodi Gardens is a park in Delhi, India. Spread over 90 acres (360,000 m2), it contains, Mohammed Shah's Tomb, Sikander Lodi's Tomb, Sheesh Gumbad and Bara Gumbad, architectural works of the 15th century Sayyid and Lodis, a Pashtun dynasty which ruled much of Northern India during the 16th century, and the site is now protected by the Archeological Survey of India (ASI). The gardens are situated between Khan Market and Safdarjung's Tomb on Lodi Road. It is beautiful and serene, and is a hotspot for morning walks for the Delhiites. The tomb of Mohammed Shah, the last of the Sayyid dynasty rulers, the earliest of the tombs in the garden, was built in 1444 by Ala-ud-din Alam Shah as a tribute to Mohammed Shah. As there is little architecture from these two periods remaining in India, Lodi Gardens is an important place of preservation. The tomb of Mohammed Shah is visible from the road, and is the earliest structure in the gardens. The architecture is characterised by the octagonal chamber, with stone chhajjas on the roof and guldastas on the corners. Another tomb within the gardens is that of Sikander Lodi, which is similar to Mohammed Shah's tomb, though without the chhatris, it was built by his son Ibrahim Lodi in 1517, the last of Sultan of Delhi from Lodi dynasty, as he was defeated by Babur, First battle of Panipat in 1526, this laying the foundation of the Mughal Empire. His tomb is often mistaken to be the Sheesh Gumbad, and is actually situated in near the tehsil office in Panipat, close to the Dargah of Sufi saint Bu Ali Shah Qalandar. It is a simple rectangular structure on a high platform approached by a flight of steps. The tomb was renovated by the British, and an inscription mentioning Ibrahim Lodi's defeat at the hands of Babur and the renovation was included in 1866. Under the Mughals major renovations would often take place depending on what occasions they would use the gardens for, under Akbar the Great the garden was used as an observatory and to keep records in a purpose built library. In the centuries, after the 15th century Sayyid and Lodi dynasties, two villages grew around the monuments, but the villagers were relocated in 1936 in order to create the gardens. During British Raj, it was landscaped by Lady Willingdon, wife of Governor-General of India, Marquess of Willingdon, and hence named the 'Lady Willingdon Park' upon its inauguration on April 9, 1936,and 1947, after Independence, it was given its present name, Lodi Gardens.

Source : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lodi_Gardens

Tags:   Lodi Gardens Lodi Medival Park Garden Mohammed Shah Tomb Architecture Sikander Lodi 'Bara Gumbad Bara Gumbad 15th century Sayyid 1444 Ala-ud-din Alam Shah octagonal chamber guldastas 1517 Ibrahim medival india Sultan Islam Islamic Islamic Architecture History Muslim photographs Photo Nikon D300 Sigma 10-20mm Mosque monument HDR 'Lady Willingdon

N 2 B 1.9K C 1 E Jul 13, 2013 F Jul 24, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Lodi Gardens is a park in Delhi, India. Spread over 90 acres (360,000 m2), it contains, Mohammed Shah's Tomb, Sikander Lodi's Tomb, Sheesh Gumbad and Bara Gumbad, architectural works of the 15th century Sayyid and Lodis, a Pashtun dynasty which ruled much of Northern India during the 16th century, and the site is now protected by the Archeological Survey of India (ASI). The gardens are situated between Khan Market and Safdarjung's Tomb on Lodi Road. It is beautiful and serene, and is a hotspot for morning walks for the Delhiites. The tomb of Mohammed Shah, the last of the Sayyid dynasty rulers, the earliest of the tombs in the garden, was built in 1444 by Ala-ud-din Alam Shah as a tribute to Mohammed Shah. As there is little architecture from these two periods remaining in India, Lodi Gardens is an important place of preservation. The tomb of Mohammed Shah is visible from the road, and is the earliest structure in the gardens. The architecture is characterised by the octagonal chamber, with stone chhajjas on the roof and guldastas on the corners. Another tomb within the gardens is that of Sikander Lodi, which is similar to Mohammed Shah's tomb, though without the chhatris, it was built by his son Ibrahim Lodi in 1517, the last of Sultan of Delhi from Lodi dynasty, as he was defeated by Babur, First battle of Panipat in 1526, this laying the foundation of the Mughal Empire. His tomb is often mistaken to be the Sheesh Gumbad, and is actually situated in near the tehsil office in Panipat, close to the Dargah of Sufi saint Bu Ali Shah Qalandar. It is a simple rectangular structure on a high platform approached by a flight of steps. The tomb was renovated by the British, and an inscription mentioning Ibrahim Lodi's defeat at the hands of Babur and the renovation was included in 1866. Under the Mughals major renovations would often take place depending on what occasions they would use the gardens for, under Akbar the Great the garden was used as an observatory and to keep records in a purpose built library. In the centuries, after the 15th century Sayyid and Lodi dynasties, two villages grew around the monuments, but the villagers were relocated in 1936 in order to create the gardens. During British Raj, it was landscaped by Lady Willingdon, wife of Governor-General of India, Marquess of Willingdon, and hence named the 'Lady Willingdon Park' upon its inauguration on April 9, 1936,and 1947, after Independence, it was given its present name, Lodi Gardens.

Source : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lodi_Gardens

Tags:   Lodi Gardens Lodi Medival Park Garden Mohammed Shah Tomb Architecture Sikander Lodi 'Bara Gumbad Bara Gumbad 15th century Sayyid 1444 Ala-ud-din Alam Shah octagonal chamber guldastas 1517 Ibrahim medival india Sultan Islam Islamic Islamic Architecture History Muslim photographs Photo Nikon D300 Sigma 10-20mm Mosque monument HDR 'Lady Willingdon

N 1 B 1.7K C 0 E Jul 13, 2013 F Jul 24, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Lodi Gardens is a park in Delhi, India. Spread over 90 acres (360,000 m2), it contains, Mohammed Shah's Tomb, Sikander Lodi's Tomb, Sheesh Gumbad and Bara Gumbad, architectural works of the 15th century Sayyid and Lodis, a Pashtun dynasty which ruled much of Northern India during the 16th century, and the site is now protected by the Archeological Survey of India (ASI). The gardens are situated between Khan Market and Safdarjung's Tomb on Lodi Road. It is beautiful and serene, and is a hotspot for morning walks for the Delhiites. The tomb of Mohammed Shah, the last of the Sayyid dynasty rulers, the earliest of the tombs in the garden, was built in 1444 by Ala-ud-din Alam Shah as a tribute to Mohammed Shah. As there is little architecture from these two periods remaining in India, Lodi Gardens is an important place of preservation. The tomb of Mohammed Shah is visible from the road, and is the earliest structure in the gardens. The architecture is characterised by the octagonal chamber, with stone chhajjas on the roof and guldastas on the corners. Another tomb within the gardens is that of Sikander Lodi, which is similar to Mohammed Shah's tomb, though without the chhatris, it was built by his son Ibrahim Lodi in 1517, the last of Sultan of Delhi from Lodi dynasty, as he was defeated by Babur, First battle of Panipat in 1526, this laying the foundation of the Mughal Empire. His tomb is often mistaken to be the Sheesh Gumbad, and is actually situated in near the tehsil office in Panipat, close to the Dargah of Sufi saint Bu Ali Shah Qalandar. It is a simple rectangular structure on a high platform approached by a flight of steps. The tomb was renovated by the British, and an inscription mentioning Ibrahim Lodi's defeat at the hands of Babur and the renovation was included in 1866. Under the Mughals major renovations would often take place depending on what occasions they would use the gardens for, under Akbar the Great the garden was used as an observatory and to keep records in a purpose built library. In the centuries, after the 15th century Sayyid and Lodi dynasties, two villages grew around the monuments, but the villagers were relocated in 1936 in order to create the gardens. During British Raj, it was landscaped by Lady Willingdon, wife of Governor-General of India, Marquess of Willingdon, and hence named the 'Lady Willingdon Park' upon its inauguration on April 9, 1936,and 1947, after Independence, it was given its present name, Lodi Gardens.

Source : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lodi_Gardens

Tags:   Lodi Gardens Lodi Medival Park Garden Mohammed Shah Tomb Architecture Sikander Lodi 'Bara Gumbad Bara Gumbad 15th century Sayyid 1444 Ala-ud-din Alam Shah octagonal chamber guldastas 1517 Ibrahim medival india Sultan Islam Islamic Islamic Architecture History Muslim photographs Photo Nikon D300 Sigma 10-20mm Mosque monument HDR 'Lady Willingdon


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