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N 78 B 635 C 14 E Jun 22, 2016 F Jun 22, 2016
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Aquaforte, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

When I stumbled across some info on the web about this waterfall I was excited to get out to see it. The short 15min hike out to this location has some beautiful views over looking an estuary. As you make the decent down to the waterfall you are quickly surrounded by lush green coniferous forest. The sound of the pounding water echoes through the trees. Your excitement builds as the sound gets louder and louder... the forest opens and your eyes are filled this spectacular view. Newfoundland is not known for its waterfalls so finding one that is worth photographing is like finding a unicorn.

**Feel free to comment, like and share with all your nature loving friends**

Tags:   Newfoundland

N 62 B 2.5K C 11 E Dec 3, 2014 F Dec 10, 2014
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For those of you that follow my work you know I'm new to landscape photography but I'm trying to learn as much as I can about it and obviously practice it as much as possible. I would love to get your thoughts on my recent landscape shot at Cape Spear, NL. Do you feel this is a good landscape shot or looks more like a "snap shot"


NikonD7100, Tamron 11-16mm @ 16mm, ISO100, F16, 1.3s exposure...this is a manual blend of two exposures.

Check out my website to see more of my work
www.bradjameswildlifephotography.com
please take a moment to Like my new Facebook page so you can following along with me there as well
www.facebook.com/bradjameswildlifephotography

N 114 B 2.9K C 15 E Jun 21, 2015 F Jun 27, 2015
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On our final morning in Bonavista Brendan and I headed to Lancaster, NL for sunrise. We had pre-scouted our compositions the evening before so at 4:58am when the sun decided to peek over the horizon I was ready to capture the magic. The rugged coastline in this location was breathtaking and of all the places I have been in Newfoundland this one tops them all. There are so many possibilities for landscape shots and I feel I have only scratched the surface of this place.
This image was hand blended from 4 exposures. Two for the sky, one for the foreground rocks/land and the other one for the water. No saturation or vibrancy was added to this image..this is how magical the color was.
With landscape photography still being very new to me I would love to know your thoughts on this image. Be honest and brutal as its the only way I will learn. I look forward to sharing more shots like these of this rugged landscape I call home.
**If you like this image please consider liking my FB page**
www.facebook.com/bradjameswildlifephotography

N 35 B 2.2K C 3 E Jun 28, 2015 F Jun 29, 2015
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Western Brook Pond
Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland, Canada

Hello from Newfoundland! This is the view that brought me here, looking down the landlocked fjord of Western Brook Pond. After a few days of travel to Newfoundland, driving by car and taking a car ferry to Newfoundland from Nova Scotia, and two weeks of waiting for the trail conditions and weather to cooperate, I finally was able to make the hike to the top of the landlocked fjord of Western Brook Pond for this amazing view. I have a few different angles in different lighting conditions, but I thought I'd start with the tight view of the gorge that really captured me when I first came across it a few months ago. This is just after sunrise on Sunday morning.

This landlocked fjord was once a true fjord leading out to the ocean, carved by glaciers. After the glaciers receded the land between the end of the pond and the ocean rose back above sea level and cut off the pond from the ocean.

My guide, Clem Reid of Clem's Trekking Adventures, was my key to this journey. In order to get to this view at sunrise and sunset (or night but it was a nearly full moon and clouded over and rained for a while) you have only two options: hike the Long Range Traverse that starts at the bottom of this gulch (or at the other end) and do the entire 3 day hike, or hire a guide to take you up for an overnight. The only time you can get here yourself without a guide or multi-day hike is in the winter by snowmobile. You can't hire the boat to take you across the pond for an overnight by yourself, since they can't guarantee they will be able to pick you up the next day due to weather. But with an experienced guide you're covered if you have to wait out the weather.

The hike itself is only 2.5 or 3 miles or so but it's quite rugged. It's easy going through the woods initially but then you get into really rocky forest terrain, and then you reach the half way point with an enormous waterfall. At the waterfall there was still a lot of snow on the south side of the gulch because the sun doesn't get into the bottom of the gulch much. A couple weeks ago the snow was so high that it would have been much more dangerous to cross, as you would risk disappearing into the snow and hitting a boulder. After the snow field it was very steep hiking through rocks and boulders and trees, and then you break out to the rock face of the gorge where you're basically walking up a waterfall, but the water level was low enough that it was easy and lots of dry areas to walk on, just really steep. The trail isn't officially maintained and isn't blazed, and people can get off track pretty easily in some spots. In the two days leading up to my hike there were 3 emergency beacon signals, resulting in at least one or two helicopter lifts for injured hikers.

We camped at the top, Clem setup a tarp for us to sleep under and did the cooking while I focused on photography, on of the many advantages to having a guide. Thanks Clem!

I'm still here in Newfoundland but will be heading back home soon, and I have lots of photos to share!

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Tags:   canada fjord gorge gros morne national park gulch landlocked fjord newfoundland pissing mare falls pond sunrise waterfall western brook pond

N 50 B 2.1K C 0 E Jun 18, 2015 F Jul 3, 2015
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The Tablelands
Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland

The mountains of the Tablelands are an incredible place. They are from the earth's mantle, but sitting on the surface. Going down the road on the edge of the Tablelands, one side of the road is brown and the other side is lush and green. From a distance the Tablelands look quite dramatic, very flat on the top with big ravines. As you can see here, there is still snow in some places, and it was still there when I left the area in late June.

From Wikipedia:
The Tablelands look more like a barren desert than traditional Newfoundland. This is due to the ultramafic rock â peridotite â which makes up the Tablelands. It is thought to originate in the Earth's mantle and was forced up from the depths during a plate collision several hundred million years ago. Peridotite lacks the usual nutrients required to sustain most plant life, hence its barren appearance. The rock is very low in calcium, very high in magnesium, and has toxic amounts of heavy metals. Peridotite is also high in iron, which accounts for its brownish color (rusted color). Underneath this weathered zone, the rock is really a dark green color.

Nikon D810A, Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 lens @ 14mm, f/2.8. Sky: Star stacked blend of 10 exposures each at ISO 12,800 for 10 seconds. The foreground is a blend of 2 other exposures at different focus distance, both at ISO 1600 for 8 minutes.

Nikon D810A, Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 lens. Sky: Single shot at ISO 3200, 14mm, f/2.8, 1 second. Foreground: Single shot at ISO 1600, 14mm, f/5.6, 2 minutes.

Tags:   astronomy astrophotography canada gros morne national park milky way newfoundland night river stars tablelands water


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