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Tim Stratford / 50 items

N 0 B 2 C 3 E Sep 18, 2017 F Sep 21, 2017
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Good morning everyone. And as the title indicates, I'm pleased to present today a rare find for yours truly. Being an Eastern Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina), that I spotted on a bike path that winds through a wooded area adjacent to Lacey Pond.

A rare find because it's only the second box turtle that I've ever come across. Unlike other pond turtle species, box turtles act more like tortoises as they are usually found far from any water. And so you'll know, here in the Midwest they are a Species of Concern in Ohio, and of Special Concern in Michigan and Indiana.

As for this particular turtle, it's a male as evident by the red eyes (irises), which males normally possess versus females that usually have brown eyes. And it was all of 6 inches (15.2 cm) in length, which indicates it's full grown.

Just two pics of which the second can be found in the comment section and my stream. Under the later in the caption you'll also find some detailed text describing this pretty turtle.

One final note, you'll notice in the above pic this turtle seems to have some kind of problem with a "goiter" like lump on its throat. It was mostly to one side so it doesn't look like the lump is from anything it might have recently tried to swallow. Otherwise it seemed perfectly fine.

Thank you for stopping by...and I hope you're having a truly nice week.

Lacey

ISO400, aperture, f/8, exposure .006 seconds (1/160) focal length 300mm


Tags:   Eastern Box Turtle Terrapene carolina carolina box turtle turtle Emydidae reptile herp wildlife nature fauna telephoto pentax K-3

N 0 B 0 C 0 E Sep 18, 2017 F Sep 21, 2017
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The Eastern Box Turtle is a subspecies of the common box turtle (Terrapene carolina). While in the pond turtle family, Emydidae, and not a tortoise, the box turtle is largely terrestrial and most often found far from water.

As the name implies, the Eastern Box Turtle is found mainly in the eastern United States. They occur as far north as southern Maine and the southern and eastern portions of the Michigan Upper Peninsula, south to southern Florida and west to eastern Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Box turtles are slow crawlers, extremely long lived, slow to mature, and have relatively few offspring per year. In captivity they've been known to live over 100 years, but in the wild, often live much shorter lives due to disease and predation. But it's not uncommon for them to reach 30 to 40 years of age. These characteristics, along with a propensity to get hit by cars and agricultural machinery, make all box turtle species particularly susceptible to anthropogenic, or human-induced, mortality.

Eastern box turtles have a high, dome-like carapace and a hinged plastron that allows total shell closure. The carapace can be of variable coloration, but is normally found brownish or black and is accompanied by a yellowish or orangish radiating pattern of lines, spots or blotches. It has a sharp, horned beak, stout limbs, and their feet are webbed only at the base. Eastern Box Turtles are small in size, usually from 4.5 - 6 inches (11.4 - 15.2 cm) in length, but occasionally some reach over 7 inches (17.8 cm).

Eastern box turtles do not travel far, usually living within an area less than 200 meters in diameter. In cold climates they hibernate through the winter in loose soil at a depth up to two feet.

Eastern Box Turtles prefer deciduous or mixed forested regions, with a moderately moist forest floor that has good drainage. Bottomland forest is preferred over hillsides and ridges. They can also be found in open grasslands, pastures, or under fallen logs or in moist ground, usually moist leaves or wet dirt. They have also been known to take "baths" in shallow streams and ponds or puddles, and during hot periods may submerge in mud for days at a time. However, if placed in water that is too deep (completely submerged), they may drown.

The eating habits of Eastern Box Turtles vary greatly due to individual taste, temperature, lighting, and their surrounding environment. Unlike warm-blooded animals, their metabolism doesn't drive their appetite; instead, they can just lessen their activity level, retreat into their shells, and halt their food intake until better conditions arise.

Eastern Box Turtles are opportunistic omnivores, meaning that they will eat almost anything that they can fit in their mouth. They will feed on a variety of animal and vegetable matter, which include earthworms, snails, slugs, grubs, beetles, caterpillars, grasses, fallen fruit, berries, mushrooms, flowers, duck weed, and carrion.

ISO400, aperture, f/8, exposure .008 seconds (1/125) focal length 300mm


Tags:   Eastern Box Turtle Terrapene carolina carolina box turtle turtle Emydidae reptile herp wildlife nature fauna telephoto pentax K-3

N 1 B 0 C 0 E Sep 21, 2017 F Sep 21, 2017
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I thought it looked a bit like it was blowing out the candles on a cake; it also happens to be my birthday, with fewer candles of course.

Tags:   Macroglossum stellatarum Hummingbird Hawk Moth Korea 105mmf2.8

N 2 B 2 C 2 E Sep 21, 2017 F Sep 21, 2017
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Tags:   Argyreus hyperbius Indian Fritillary Korea 105mmf2.8

N 16 B 76 C 2 E Sep 8, 2017 F Sep 21, 2017
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Tags:   Australia Australian Birds Birds Natural History Wildlife Zebra Finch


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