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Ajit Chouhan / 50 items

N 2 B 15 C 0 E Aug 17, 2018 F Aug 17, 2018
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Tags:   flower photography 2018 canon macro rain drops flowers

N 19 B 273 C 3 E Aug 15, 2018 F Aug 17, 2018
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Tags:   street portrait portrait musician guitar bass guitar jazz blues music performer artist Nikon sunglasses

N 1 B 14 C 0 E Aug 17, 2018 F Aug 17, 2018
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N 2 B 75 C 0 E Jan 1, 1950 F Aug 17, 2018
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“...turn to Conceptual Photography through Zen camera of the mind. Or take up gardening––which is surely the most perfect practice of Zen outside of non-gardening.”
-photographer Edward Putzar

།ས་གཞི་སྤོས་ཀྱིས་བྱུགས་ཤིང་མེ་ཏོག་བཀྲམ།
།རི་རབ་གླིང་བཞི་ཉི་ཟླས་བརྒྱན་པ་འདི།
།སངས་རྒྱས་ཞིང་དུ་དམིགས་ཏེ་དབུལ་བར་བགྱི།
།འགྲོ་ཀུན་རྣམ་དག་ཞིང་ལ་སྤྱོད་པར་ཤོག།།
།ཨི་དཾ་གུ་རུ་རཏྣ་མཎྜལ་ཀཾ་ནི་རྱཱ་ཏ་ཡཱ་མི།

___________

The term “ukiyo,"which can be translated as "floating world" was homophonous with the ancient Buddhist term signifying "this world of sorrow and grief.” Ukiyo-e is a genre of Japanese art which flourished from the 17th through 19th centuries. Its artists often produced woodblock prints of such subjects as flora and fauna. American Ernest Fenollosa was the earliest Western devotee of Japanese culture, and did much to promote Japanese art—Hokusai's works featured prominently at Fenollosa’s inaugural exhibition of Japanese art at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and in Tokyo in 1898 he curated the first ukiyo-e exhibition in Japan. By the end of the 19th century, the popularity of ukiyo-e in the West drove prices beyond the means of most collectors—some, such as Degas, traded their own paintings for such prints. Japanese art, and particularly ukiyo-e prints, came to influence Western art from the time of the early Impressionists. Early painter-collectors incorporated Japanese themes and compositional techniques into their works as early as the 1860s: the patterned wallpapers and rugs in Manet's paintings were inspired by ukiyo-e's patterned kimonos, and Whistler focused his attention on ephemeral elements of nature as in ukiyo-e landscapes. Van Gogh was an avid collector, and painted copies in oil of prints by Hiroshige and Eisen. Degas and Cassatt depicted fleeting, everyday moments in Japanese-influenced compositions. Ukiyo-e's flat perspective and unmodulated colors were a particular influence on graphic designers and poster makers. Toulouse-Lautrec's lithographs displayed his interest in ukiyo-e's flat colours and outlined forms. He signed much of this work with his initials in a circle, imitating the seals on Japanese prints. Other artists of the time who drew influence from ukiyo-e include Monet, La Farge, Gauguin, and Les Nabis members such as Bonnard and Vuillard. French composer Claude Debussy drew inspiration for his music from the prints of Hokusai and Horoshige, most prominently in La mer (1905). Imagist poets such as Amy Lowell and Ezra Pound found inspiration in ukiyo-e prints; Lowell published a book of poetry called Pictures of the Floating World (1919) on Asian style.

Tags:   Dennis Cordell Earth nature BUDDHISM wabi-sabi ukiyo-e shibui haiku Zen garden koan Art-Nouveau plant Flowers vegetation Pre-Raphaelite environment Gaia

N 2 B 78 C 0 E Jan 1, 1950 F Aug 17, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
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  • M

“...turn to Conceptual Photography through Zen camera of the mind. Or take up gardening––which is surely the most perfect practice of Zen outside of non-gardening.”
-photographer Edward Putzar

།ས་གཞི་སྤོས་ཀྱིས་བྱུགས་ཤིང་མེ་ཏོག་བཀྲམ།
།རི་རབ་གླིང་བཞི་ཉི་ཟླས་བརྒྱན་པ་འདི།
།སངས་རྒྱས་ཞིང་དུ་དམིགས་ཏེ་དབུལ་བར་བགྱི།
།འགྲོ་ཀུན་རྣམ་དག་ཞིང་ལ་སྤྱོད་པར་ཤོག།།
།ཨི་དཾ་གུ་རུ་རཏྣ་མཎྜལ་ཀཾ་ནི་རྱཱ་ཏ་ཡཱ་མི།

___________

The term “ukiyo,"which can be translated as "floating world" was homophonous with the ancient Buddhist term signifying "this world of sorrow and grief.” Ukiyo-e is a genre of Japanese art which flourished from the 17th through 19th centuries. Its artists often produced woodblock prints of such subjects as flora and fauna. American Ernest Fenollosa was the earliest Western devotee of Japanese culture, and did much to promote Japanese art—Hokusai's works featured prominently at Fenollosa’s inaugural exhibition of Japanese art at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and in Tokyo in 1898 he curated the first ukiyo-e exhibition in Japan. By the end of the 19th century, the popularity of ukiyo-e in the West drove prices beyond the means of most collectors—some, such as Degas, traded their own paintings for such prints. Japanese art, and particularly ukiyo-e prints, came to influence Western art from the time of the early Impressionists. Early painter-collectors incorporated Japanese themes and compositional techniques into their works as early as the 1860s: the patterned wallpapers and rugs in Manet's paintings were inspired by ukiyo-e's patterned kimonos, and Whistler focused his attention on ephemeral elements of nature as in ukiyo-e landscapes. Van Gogh was an avid collector, and painted copies in oil of prints by Hiroshige and Eisen. Degas and Cassatt depicted fleeting, everyday moments in Japanese-influenced compositions. Ukiyo-e's flat perspective and unmodulated colors were a particular influence on graphic designers and poster makers. Toulouse-Lautrec's lithographs displayed his interest in ukiyo-e's flat colours and outlined forms. He signed much of this work with his initials in a circle, imitating the seals on Japanese prints. Other artists of the time who drew influence from ukiyo-e include Monet, La Farge, Gauguin, and Les Nabis members such as Bonnard and Vuillard. French composer Claude Debussy drew inspiration for his music from the prints of Hokusai and Horoshige, most prominently in La mer (1905). Imagist poets such as Amy Lowell and Ezra Pound found inspiration in ukiyo-e prints; Lowell published a book of poetry called Pictures of the Floating World (1919) on Asian style.

Tags:   Dennis Cordell Earth nature BUDDHISM wabi-sabi ukiyo-e shibui haiku Zen garden koan Art-Nouveau plant Flowers vegetation Pre-Raphaelite environment Gaia


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