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User / Jeff Lack Wildlife&Nature
5,709 items

N 77 B 431 C 41 E May 23, 2019 F Aug 22, 2019
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Reed Warbler - Acrocephalus scirpaceus

The Reed Warbler is a medium-sized warbler of reedbeds. A summer visitor to the UK, it weaves its nest as a sling between two or three reed stems, and lays three to five eggs in it. Forming monogamous pairs, both parents raise the chicks.

Reed Warblers are common victims of brood-parasitism by Cuckoos.

It is migratory, wintering in sub-Saharan Africa.

Population:

UK breeding:
130,000 pairs


Tags:   Reed Warbler Birds. Bird Bird Photography Avian Animal Animals Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Water-Birds Wildlife Photography Waterways Warbler Warblers Jeff Lack Photography Reservoirs Reeds Reed Beds Lakes Ponds Canals Marshland Marshes Nikon Nature Photography Nature Countryside

N 64 B 537 C 33 E Aug 15, 2019 F Aug 22, 2019
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Common Tern - Sterna Hirundo

Juvenile with Parant!

It is strongly migratory, wintering in coastal tropical and subtropical regions. Breeding adults have light grey upperparts, white to very light grey underparts, a black cap, orange-red legs, and a narrow pointed bill. Depending on the subspecies, the bill may be mostly red with a black tip or all black. There are a number of similar species, including the partly sympatric Arctic tern, which can be separated on plumage details, leg and bill colour, or vocalisations.

Breeding in a wider range of habitats than any of its relatives, the common tern nests on any flat, poorly vegetated surface close to water, including beaches and islands, and it readily adapts to artificial substrates such as floating rafts. The nest may be a bare scrape in sand or gravel, but it is often lined or edged with whatever debris is available. Up to three eggs may be laid, their dull colours and blotchy patterns providing camouflage on the open beach.

Population:

UK breeding:
12,000 pairs


Tags:   Common Tern Terns Tern Avian Animal Animals Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Water-Birds Waterways Wildlife Photography Jeff Lack Photography Sea Birds Shore-Birds Seashore Summer Migrant Sea Countryside Coastal Birds Coastline Coast Lakes Estuaries Estuary Reservoirs

N 97 B 808 C 50 E Aug 20, 2019 F Aug 22, 2019
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Great Crested Grebe - Podiceps Cristatus

Juvenile

The great crested grebe has an elaborate mating display. Like all grebes, it nests on the water's edge, since its legs are set relatively far back and it is thus unable to walk very well. Usually two eggs are laid, and the fluffy, striped young grebes are often carried on the adult's back. In a clutch of two or more hatchlings, male and female grebes will each identify their 'favourites', which they alone will care for and teach

Unusually, young grebes are capable of swimming and diving almost at hatching. The adults teach these skills to their young by carrying them on their back and diving, leaving the chicks to float on the surface; they then re-emerge a few feet away so that the chicks may swim back onto them.

The great crested grebe feeds mainly on fish, but also small crustaceans, insects small frogs and newts.

This species was hunted almost to extinction in the United Kingdom in the 19th century for its head plumes, which were used to decorate hats and ladies' undergarments. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds was set up to help protect this species, which is again a common sight.

The great crested grebe and its behaviour was the subject of one of the landmark publications in avian ethology: Julian Huxley's 1914 paper on The Courtship‐habits of the Great Crested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus).

Population:

UK breeding:

4,600 pairs

UK wintering:

19,000 individuals

Tags:   Great Crested Grebe Grebe Grebes Avian Animal Animals Birds. Bird Bird Photography Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Water-Birds Waterways Wildlife Photography Estuaries Estuary Reservoirs River Birds Reeds Reed Beds Lakes Ponds Countryside Coastal Birds Nature Photography Nature Ornithology Nikon Jeff Lack Photography Marshland Marshes

N 139 B 1.3K C 88 E May 23, 2019 F Aug 21, 2019
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Beautiful Demoiselle (m) - Calopteryx Virgo

Mainly found along streams and rivers, particularly those with sand or gravel bottoms. The males rest on bank side vegetation waiting for females.
Males are territorial, perching in bankside plants and trees, waiting for females or chasing. They chase passing insects, often returning to the same perch. Males can stray well away from water, females live away from water unless egg-laying or seeking a mate.

As with the banded demoiselle is also in the blue wing-demoiselle a pronounced territorial behavior of sexually mature males. These days occupy territories that they defend against other males. The defense consists mostly in threatening gestures. For this they spread their wings and put them on display so clearly visible, there is also Drohflügen and in rare cases to air combat between rival males. Optimal areas correspond to the optimal nesting places for the females and are characterized by a normally increased flow and a suitable oviposition substrate in the potential breeding sites from. The size of the spots and their distance apart is the density of the population dependent as well as the occurrences of the water and may be between several meters and a few decimetres. Males who do not occupy spots can keep themselves in the vegetation on the shore and try to mate with fly to females or to fill vacant spots. Especially when only a few males are present, the territorial defense is very aggressive, with a higher number of competing male aggression but decreases significantly. The males sit in their areas mostly in exposed places in the vegetation, which extends over the water, sometimes on vegetation or rocks cushions amid the waters. This seat is waiting at the same time the center of the district they do their gaze primarily on the aquatic center and will show a behavior that is referred to as "wings lapping" and in which the wings beat quickly down and slowly lifted. It is believed that it is mainly used for communication, it also supports the ventilation in the thorax and accordingly probably also plays a role in thermoregulation of the animals

Tags:   Beautiful Demoiselle Demoiselle Odonata Dragonflies Dragonfly Damselfly Insects Insect Wildlife. Wetlands Wildlife Photography Waterways Jeff Lack Photography Lakes Ponds Marshland Marshes Hedgerows Verges Countryside Copse Glades Macro Nature Photography Nature

N 112 B 1.2K C 47 E May 23, 2019 F Aug 21, 2019
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Beautiful Demoiselle (f) - Calopteryx Virgo

Mainly found along streams and rivers, particularly those with sand or gravel bottoms. The males rest on bank side vegetation waiting for females.
Males are territorial, perching in bankside plants and trees, waiting for females or chasing. They chase passing insects, often returning to the same perch. Males can stray well away from water, females live away from water unless egg-laying or seeking a mate.

As with the banded demoiselle is also in the blue wing-demoiselle a pronounced territorial behavior of sexually mature males. These days occupy territories that they defend against other males. The defense consists mostly in threatening gestures. For this they spread their wings and put them on display so clearly visible, there is also Drohflügen and in rare cases to air combat between rival males. Optimal areas correspond to the optimal nesting places for the females and are characterized by a normally increased flow and a suitable oviposition substrate in the potential breeding sites from. The size of the spots and their distance apart is the density of the population dependent as well as the occurrences of the water and may be between several meters and a few decimetres. Males who do not occupy spots can keep themselves in the vegetation on the shore and try to mate with fly to females or to fill vacant spots. Especially when only a few males are present, the territorial defense is very aggressive, with a higher number of competing male aggression but decreases significantly. The males sit in their areas mostly in exposed places in the vegetation, which extends over the water, sometimes on vegetation or rocks cushions amid the waters. This seat is waiting at the same time the center of the district they do their gaze primarily on the aquatic center and will show a behavior that is referred to as "wings lapping" and in which the wings beat quickly down and slowly lifted. It is believed that it is mainly used for communication, it also supports the ventilation in the thorax and accordingly probably also plays a role in thermoregulation of the animals

Tags:   Beautiful Demoiselle Demoiselle Dragonflies Dragonfly Odonata Insects Insect Wildlife. Wildbirds Wildlife Photography Waterways Jeff Lack Photography Canals Countryside Copse Glades Grasslands Lakes Ponds Verges Hedgerows Marshland Marshes Macro Nature Photography Nature


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