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User / pekabo90401 / Sets / Sycamore Canyon north of Malibu
Pekabo / 8 items

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"It’s a commonly held conception that only male birds sing. And for many birds in North America that is indeed the case. However, there are cases of female birds that sing as well – finches, orioles, cardinals, and some warblers (occasionally), among others. In North American wrens, for the most part, only the males sing, but exceptions include House Wren, Cactus Wren, AND Canyon Wren."
Andrew Spencer earbirding.com

Tags:   Canyon monkey Catherpes mexicanus Canyon Wren Cucarachero Barranquero Troglodyte des canyons pekabo90401 100-400 80D canon 80 D Canon Camaraderie Lightroom lind wren Wesen Vogel oiseau Sycamore Canyon southern california birds Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles coastal southern cailfornia roitelet Branch monkey winterkoninkje 鹪 τρυποφράκτης trẻ con Zaunkönig レンチ 렌 ران крапивник strzyżyk

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"Spring is on its way when the loud joyful call of the flicker: "Wicker, wicker, wicker", echoes through the woodlands. Males are known for drumming in long continuous rolls made by rapid blows with his bill. Male Flickers will often return to their favorite drumming spot where most likely it is the loudest and noisiest spot.
...
Did you know?

If you want to attract a flicker to your backyard keep a fresh birdbath, don't kill your ants in your backyard and lay out apples, peanut butter, or raisins.

The young stay with their parents for up to six weeks.

Flickers breed for life."
naturemappingfoundation.org

ebird.org/view/checklist/S55035539

(We brought home a Win 10 PC. Chock-a-block with bloatware. I think somehow our gnashing of teeth is powering a dark metropolis somewhere.... like the plot of Monsters Inc where the screams of children provide the power for Monstropolis.)

Tags:   pekabo90401 Sycamore Canyon coastal Southern California northern flicker Friendship Fugl flicker Stump monkey Canon Camaraderie canon 80 D 100-400 80D Canyon monkey Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles southern california birds Ventura County Birds springtime Lightroom lind Wesen Vogel woodpecker displaying bird Colaptes auratus Carpintero Escapulario Pic flamboyant drumming monkey chim avem oiseau red-shafted flicker eats ants! black bib and spotted belly!

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I love these graceful birds with their spooky eyes and too long of a tail.
"Finally, there is the Wrentit (right) of the New World. It is a shy but vocal little bird. Like many Asian parrotbills, pairs apparently mate for life and are entirely resident, spending their entire lives within a few acres of scrub. Their characteristic "bouncing-ball" territorial song is easily imitated and is the soundtrack of California chaparral, but they also give a cat-like purrr and a variety of scolding notes.

At various times Wrentit has been considered most closely related to bushtits, to titmice, to babblers, to Old World warblers, or to wrens; it has at various times been elevated to its own family [Chamaeidae]. Sibley & Ahlquist (1982) used DNA-DNA hybridization technique to compare it with various babblers and Old World warblers plus a titmouse, a gnatcatcher, a kinglet, and more distantly related birds. The results showed that the Wrentit was closest to certain babblers and to "warblers" in the genus Sylvia.

Genetic work (Burns & Barhoum 2006) showed that Wrentit became isolated in the dense California chaparral during the Pleistocene. Its ancestors presumably arrived in North America across the Bering Straits land-bridge. It diverged from its ancestors between 6.5 and 8.1 million years ago. During the cooler centuries of the Pleistocene, over 200,000 years ago, its range was probably restricted to southern California and Baja. With the retreat of the ice age, its range expanded north through the foothill chaparral on both sides of California's Central Valley, eventually reaching southern Oregon. Initially genetic studies of the Wrentit (Cibois 2003, Burns & Barhoum 2006) suggested that its closest relatives were parrotbills in the genera Alcippe, Chrysomma, and/or Paradoxornis, but Moyle et al. (2012) found it closer to the parrotbills in Conostoma.

It is difficult to anticipate whether the Parrotbill family will be a permanent Family. Certainly the recent trend is to lump it in the "new" Sylviidae. But I see a number of good reasons to conserve its status as a Family, and so tentatively do so here."
by Don Robertson
creagrus.home.montereybay.com

Tags:   Chamaea fasciata Wrentit Pleistocene bird pekabo90401 birds of Ventura County southern california birds Bird watching Sycamore Canyon springtime Wesen Canon Camaraderie 80D canon 80 D 100-400 Friendship Fugl Canyon monkey PARROTBILLS & ALLIES Cama brune Camea oiseau ibon avem not a wren not a tit... oh grow up! birdwatching with friends

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"Male's song is a series of notes on one pitch running into a trill, known as the "bouncing ball." Female's song lacks the trill, is shorter and not given as frequently. Call is a soft prrt. Both sexes sing, defend the territory, incubate, and brood. Song is the best way to distinguish sexes."
scbirdingguide.org

Tags:   Wrentit Chamaea fasciata Chaparral monkey Branch monkey Sycamore Canyon Bird watching southern california birds 100-400 80D canon 80 D Canon Camaraderie Friendship Fugl Lightroom lind oiseau avem Wesen Cama brune Camea

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"Few terrestrial birds are as restricted to rocky cliffs or outcrops as this one. It inhabits the same territories year-round, commonly nesting in sheltered rock crevices, using its long, decurved bill and flattened head to probe for spiders and insects in rock crevices. Although not generally associated with human development, the Canyon Wren does inhabit villages in the southwestern United States and Mexico, apparently undeterred by human presence. "
BNA Account Authors: Jones, Stephanie L., and Joseph Scott Dieni

ebird.org/view/checklist/S56901353

Tags:   Canyon monkey Canyon Wren Sycamore Canyon Branch monkey Wesen Vogel oiseau Wren pekabo90401 southern california birds Bird watching birdwatching Ventura County Catherpes mexicanus Canon Camaraderie Lightroom lind 100-400 80D canon 80 D Cucarachero Barranquero Troglodyte des canyons coastal southern california birds


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