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Pekabo / 2,579 items

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"Cactus wrens (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) build bulky, domed nests with a tunnel-shaped entrance in cactus (especially cholla) or thorn trees. Although conspicuous, their nests are inaccessible to predators because they are surrounded by sharp thorns (hence the other common name for the cactus wren, desert thorn bird).

A cactus wren nest is constructed of coarse grasses and plant fibers. Inside, the 2 to 5 white to pale pink eggs, heavily spotted with brown, are incubated by the female. While the female broods the eggs, the male builds several extra nests. Once the original eggs have hatched, the female chooses another nest in which to lay a second clutch of eggs. The male tends to the newborn chicks while the female incubates the second (or third) batch of eggs.

Why do cactus wrens build several nests, called dummy nests? The answer is not certain, however, having a new nest available as soon as the first clutch of eggs hatches enables the cactus wren to raise more young. Extra nests may fool predators. Adult cactus wrens also use unoccupied nests to roost at night, providing shelter and protection."

thenatureniche.com
gingkochris

Tags:   cactus monkey pekabo90401 palos verdes birds alta vicente trail Palos Verdes Penninsula avem oiseau Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus Cucarachero Desértico Troglodyte des cactus 100-400 80D canon 80 D Canon Camaraderie Lightroom lind dummy nest Cactus Wren nest Friendship Fugl Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles birds of palos verdes Vogel Wesen large Wren peninsula monkey more cactus wren babies on the way?

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This was the day to get out. Shake off the heebie-jeebies we all had after the recent earthquakes some 120 miles away. The first one hit while I was at work in a huge new building designed to roll and not crash during a quake. I had to stay on my feet, people needed me.
The second (and third back-to-back) hit while we were home and seemed to last forever. I had time to notice the doors swinging on their hinges . Not a drop of our drinks spilled.
I wish everyone was so lucky.
Pictured is one of the class of 2019 CAGNs. Living in the moment.
ebird.org/view/checklist/S58044146

Tags:   CAGN gnat raptor juvenile bird Rare bird not rare for this area California Gnatcatcher Canon Camaraderie canon 80 D 100-400 chim oiseau avem Chaparral monkey Branch monkey tiny and fast tiny bird 80D palos verdes birds Alta Vicente Trail Point Vicente southern california birds Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles pekabo90401 Lightroom lind Wesen Vogel birding with W9 & Jerry

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We found these butterflies while exploring the Charlton Flats area of the Angeles National Forest. A lookout tower nearby was a sweet day hike before the Station Fire of 2009.
As usual, there is some interesting stuff out there once I start looking....

"The lookout rests on a rocky ridge. There is sparse vegetation, mainly some stunted yerba santa, a variety of small high country buckwheats and a few now-bedraggled rabbitbrush. But this doesn't faze the butterflies. This place could be called "Butterfly Hill"! It is a "lek", a mating ground for butterflies. The behavior is called "hilltopping". The males look for females by engaging one and all in beautiful, spiraling courtship dances. Sometimes, the pale swallowtails, large cream-and-black butterflies, spin and twist thirty feet into the air. Others--California sister, variable checkerspot, callippe fritillary, spring azure and propertius duskywing--flutter and flash their wings as well, but none go as high as the titillated pales.
George and I fill the guzzlers for the butterflies and other animals. This is no minor undertaking. George climbs on top of the ten-foot-tall water tank and removes the cover. I hand up the bucket. He dips it down into the tank stretching his arm as far as he can since the water reserve is low. Gently he hands the bucket down to me. It's heavy and I splash the precious water over my jeans. More carefully I hike up the slope to fill the reservoir. We do this twice...."

Tom Chester/Jane Strong
tchester.org/index.html

tchester.org/sgm/js/vetter/00jun10.html

Please correct me if I have the ID wrong.

Tags:   butterflies Flower monkey Angeles National Forest Angeles Crest Highway birding with Jerry & W9 100-400 80D canon 80 D Canon checkerspot Lightroom Los Angeles local mountains San Gabriel Mountains day trip July 2019 Summer fun friendly butterflies butterfly buddies post Station Fire recovery odd location per flickr panda? looking for crossbills...

N 401 B 2.0K C 40 E Jun 6, 2019 F Jul 1, 2019
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As we hit the doldrums, the time before the next migration, I think about Star Saphir, one of the speakers in a wonderful documentary The Central Park Effect. She scheduled her doctor appointments for June and July....
Here is a photo from a Springtime adventure...

Tags:   northern flicker flicker Branch monkey Sycamore Canyon Birds of Ventura County Colaptes auratus Carpintero Escapulario Pic flamboyant woodpecker Canon Camaraderie 100-400 80D canon 80 D Canyon monkey Wesen Vogel oiseau Lightroom lind coastal southern california southern california birds Bird watching avem Friendship Fugl red-shafted flicker

N 410 B 2.0K C 39 E May 13, 2019 F Jun 28, 2019
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"While the burning of desert riparian vegetation has negative effects on many bird species, Ash-throated Flycatchers may actually benefit. Smith et al. (2007) found that Ash-throated Flycatchers responded positively in recently burned desert riparian habitats, possibly because of increased cavity availability and abundant food from fire-induced insect hatches. Response to fire in California oak woodland was also positive (Purcell and Stephens 2005). There has not been sufficient study to determine whether fire might be beneficial or detrimental throughout its entire range. Smith, et al. note that proper post-fire management (such as leaving burnt snags standing) is an important factor if fires are to improve habitat."
prbo.org
Our recent fires have changed our landscapes. Trees stand tall without leaves or charred black in some areas. The ATFL seem to love it.

Tags:   ash throated flycatcher Flycatcher Malibu Creek State Park creek monkey pekabo90401 Myiarchus cinerascens Copetón Cenizo Tyran à gorge cendrée 100-400 80D canon 80 D Canon Camaraderie chim Lightroom lind Friendship Fugl southern california birds Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles avem oiseau Wesen Vogel ATFC


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