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User / Silvietta Sanremo / Contacts
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N 108 B 9.3K C 10 E Nov 19, 2018 F Jan 15, 2019
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We rarely saw these House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) around our house until recently when a pair has suddenly appeared and seem to be building a nest.

House Sparrows are actually large finches.They are usually seen in small to medium-sized groups, but may occur in huge numbers. The male has a conspicuous grey crown, black face and throat, and dark black and brown upperparts. The remainder of the under parts are pale grey-brown. When breeding, the black of the throat extends to the chest and upper belly. The bill also changes from brown to black. The female is slightly paler than the male and lacks the grey crown and black face, instead having a pale buff eye stripe. Young House Sparrows are similar to the adult female, but are duller with some mottling on the crown, and have a darker bill. (From Birds In Backyards).

Thanks to all my Flickr photostream followers I have now more than one million views, thank you.

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it is very much appreciated.

My Blog: www.alldigi.com
This is an image from some time ago captured at home, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
Nikon D810 camera with 200-500mm, f/5.6E ED, lens at f/11, 1/800 sec, ISO1,600.


Tags:   I love Birds I love nature feathers birds animals nature beautiful beauty of nature birds are beautiful Superb birds mynikonlife Nikon D810 Nikon D810 FX Nikon Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6E ED AF-S Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6E E ED AF-S Acratech Panoramic Head Acratech Panoramic Head Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod Sparrow house House Sparrow bird home Australia Gold Coast Queensland

N 12 B 237 C 3 E Apr 20, 2017 F Jan 13, 2019
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The Eastern Great Egret's (Ardea modesta) overall plumage is white, and, for most of the year, when not breeding, the bill and facial skin are yellow. The feet are dark olive-grey or sooty black, as are the legs. During the breeding season, the bill turns mostly black and the facial skin becomes green. Also at this time, long hair-like feathers (nuptial plumes) hang across the lower back, and the legs become pinkish-yellow at the top. Young Great Egrets are similar to the adults, but have a blackish tip to the bill.

The Great Egret can be confused with other white egrets found in Australia. It can be distinguished by the length of its neck, which is greater than the length of its body (and with a noticeable kink two-thirds of the way up), a dark line extending from the base of the bill to behind the eye and the overall larger size.

Great Egrets occur throughout most of the world. They are common throughout Australia, with the exception of the most arid areas.

They prefer shallow water, particularly when flowing, but may be seen on any watered area, including damp grasslands. Great Egrets can be seen alone or in small flocks, often with other egret species, and roost at night in groups.

The Great Egret usually feeds alone. It feeds on molluscs, amphibians, aquatic insects, small reptiles, crustaceans and occasionally other small animals, but fish make up the bulk of its diet. The Great Egret usually hunts in water, wading through the shallows, or standing motionless before stabbing at prey. Birds have also been seen taking prey while in flight.

The Great Egret breeds in colonies, and often in association with cormorants, ibises and other egrets. Both sexes construct the nest, which is a large platform of sticks, placed in a tree over the water. The previous years' nest may often be re-used. Both sexes also incubate the eggs and care for the young. (From Birds in Backyards).

Thanks to all my Flickr photostream followers I have now more than one million views, thank you.

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it is very much appreciated.

My Blog: www.alldigi.com
This is an image from some time ago captured at Burleigh, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
Nikon D810 camera with 200-500mm, f/5.6E ED, lens at f/5.6, 1/2,000 sec, ISO2,500.

Tags:   Burleigh Gold Coast Queensland Australia I love Birds I love nature feathers birds animals nature beautiful beauty of nature birds are beautiful Superb birds mynikonlife Nikon D810 Nikon D810 FX Nikon Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6E ED AF-S Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6E E ED AF-S Acratech Panoramic Head Acratech Panoramic Head Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod

N 9 B 181 C 3 E Jan 12, 2019 F Jan 12, 2019
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The Dusky Moorhen (Gallinula tenebrosa) is a medium-sized, dark grey-black water bird with a white undertail. It has a red bill with a yellow tip and a red facial shield. Young birds are much duller and browner than adults, with a greenish bill and face shield.

Two other water hen species are similar to the Dusky Moorhen but can be easily distinguished. The similarly-sized Eurasian Coot, (Fulica atra), has a white bill and face shield and a red eye. The Purple Swamphen, (Porphyrio porphyrio), is much larger and has a distinct purple-blue colouring.

The Dusky Moorhen is found from Indonesia through New Guinea to Australia. It is widespread in eastern and south-western Australia, ranging from Cooktown to eastern South Australia and in the southern corner of Western Australia.

The Dusky Moorhen is found in wetlands, including swamps, rivers, and artificial waterways. It prefers open water and water margins with reeds, rushes and waterlilies, but may be found on grasses close to water such as parks, pastures and lawns.
This Dusky Moorhen was found raising its chicks at Rosser Park, Botanic Gardens, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

The lake here is not very nice at the moment with green algae growth in the water, probably due to the very dry conditions. The water level is also very low.

Thanks to all my Flickr photostream followers I have now more than one million views, thank you.

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it is very much appreciated.

My Blog: www.alldigi.com

Nikon D810 camera with 200mm, f/4D, IF, ED, Micro lens at f/10, 1/500 sec, ISO640.

Tags:   Dusky Moorhen Gallinula tenebrosa dusky moorhen I love Birds I love nature feathers birds animals nature beautiful beauty of nature birds are beautiful Superb birds mynikonlife Nikon D810 Nikon D810 FX Nikon Nikkor 200mm f/4D IF ED AF Micro Macro Nikkor 200mm f/4D f/4 IF ED AF Micro Macro 4 D Acratech Panoramic Head Acratech Panoramic Head Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod Queensland Australia Coast Gold Coast Gold

N 10 B 245 C 4 E Apr 20, 2017 F Jan 10, 2019
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The Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) is instantly recognisable in both plumage and voice. It is generally off-white below, faintly barred with dark brown, and brown on the back and wings. The tail is more rufous, broadly barred with black. There is a conspicuous dark brown eye-stripe through the face. It is one of the larger members of the kingfisher family.
Laughing Kookaburras are found throughout eastern Australia. They have been introduced to Tasmania, the extreme south-west of Western Australia, and New Zealand. Replaced by the Blue-winged Kookaburra in central northern and north-western Australia, with some overlap in Queensland, although this species is more coastal.
The Laughing Kookaburra inhabits most areas where there are suitable trees.
Laughing Kookaburras feed mostly on insects, worms and crustaceans, although small snakes, mammals, frogs and birds may also be eaten. Prey is seized by pouncing from a suitable perch. Small prey is eaten whole, but larger prey is killed by bashing it against the ground or tree branch.
Laughing Kookaburras are believed to pair for life. The nest is a bare chamber in a naturally occurring tree hollow or in a burrow excavated in an arboreal (tree-dwelling) termite mound. Both sexes share the incubation duties and both care for the young. Other Laughing Kookaburras, usually offspring of the previous one to two years, act as 'helpers' during the breeding season. Every bird in the group shares all parenting duties. From Birds in Backyards.

Thanks to all my Flickr photostream followers I have now more than one million views, thank you.

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it is very much appreciated.

My Blog: www.alldigi.com

Since my 200-500mm lens is now gone this is an image from some time ago. Nikon D810 camera with 200-500mm lens. 500mm, ISO 1,250, 1/20 sec. at f/5.6.

Pretty amazed that this is at 1/20 second at 500mm.

Image captured at West Burleigh, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Tags:   I love Birds I love nature feathers birds animals nature beautiful beauty of nature birds are beautiful Superb birds mynikonlife Nikon D810 Nikon D810 FX Nikon Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6E ED AF-S Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6E E ED AF-S Acratech Panoramic Head Acratech Panoramic Head Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod Dacelo novaeguineae Laughing Kookaburra Laughing Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae West Burleigh Gold Coast Queensland Australia

N 7 B 147 C 3 E Jan 9, 2019 F Jan 8, 2019
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The Brown Honeyeaters (Lichmera indistincta) regularly frequent our backyard and travel around the grevilleas feeding from the nectar.

The Brown Honeyeater is a medium-small pale grey-brown honeyeater with a distinctive yellow tuft behind its eye. It also has yellow to olive wing patches and tail panels. It is pale grey below, darker olive brown above and has a long curved black bill. Young birds are paler with more yellow colouring and a yellow gape (open bill). It has a fast, undulating flight and is seen either singly, in pairs or small flocks in flowering trees and shrubs. (Birds in Backyards).

Thanks to all my Flickr photostream followers I have now more than one million views, thank you.

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it is very much appreciated.

My Blog: www.alldigi.com

Nikon D810 camera with 300mm lens. ISO 160, 1/500 sec. at f/5.6.

Tags:   I love Birds I love nature feathers birds animals nature beautiful beauty of nature birds are beautiful Superb birds mynikonlife Nikon D810 Nikon D810 FX Nikon Nikkor 300mm f/4D IF ED AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/4D f/4 IF ED AF-S 4 D Acratech Panoramic Head Acratech Panoramic Head Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod Gitzo GM5541 Carbon Monopod Brown Honeyeater Brown Honeyeater Lichmera indistincta


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